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A view from the bridge

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Introduction

A View From The Bridge ''A view from the bridge'' was written by Arthur Miller in 1947. Arthur Miller uses a range of dramatic techniques effectively throughout the play to create tension and suspense, but particularly in the climax at the beginning of Act 2. These dramatic effects consist of; Stage direction, Greek tragedy, Foregrounding, Scenery, actions such as tension and climax and finally dramatic irony. In a view from the bridge, the central themes are, love, justice, family, the law and codes of honour. Together, they increase the characters development, so as an audience we empathise with the characters personal views, thoughts and opinions. Dramatic irony, is when the audience knows what is going to happen before the Protagonist is embedded within the text. An example of dramatic irony in the play is when Eddie returns home drunk whilst Catherine and Rodolpho are upstairs in the bedroom making love. This creates tension and suspense between the characters and also the audience, as we already know of Eddie's hatred for Rodolpho because of Catherine's loving feelings towards him. Arthur Miller's use of the specific elements of a 'Greek Tragedy' make the play extremely intense. The rules of a Greek tragedy consist of; "A protagonist which dies at the end of the play" The protagonist is clearly Eddie, as he is the central character and also sadly dies at the end of the play, he is brutally killed by Marco. ...read more.

Middle

Catherine has always had an innocent fondness toward Eddie, but Eddie takes it the wrong way which makes their "father and daughter relationship" seem more sexual and possessive. "[As she strives to free herself, he kisses her on the mouth]" Eddie was obviously drunk when this stage direction was performed, but when your drunk your true feelings come out and Eddies passionate love for Catherine had finally been .sexually released. This had a massive impact on the audience as Arthur Miller created suspense in this section. Whilst Eddie is sexually obsessed over Catherine, Catherine just wants unconditional, parental love from Eddie and Romantic sexual love from Rodolpho. Catherine later bursts out ''I'll Kill you''- If Catherine was secretly in love with Eddie like Eddie was with Catherine, she would have not threaten to kill him. When Catherine and Rodolpho are home alone, there is tension building up. Catherine starts curiously questioning Rodolpho, "Suppose I wanted to live in Italy." She is testing his love for her, as Eddie had informed Catherine that Rodolpho is most l;likely using her just to be an American Citizen. Catherine refused to believe this but Eddie might of got the better side of her. Catherine later exploded with-''You don't know, nobody knows!''- This is showing Catherine's neglect and isolation from Rodolpho and Eddie. She Presumes that no one understands her, but the audience thinks she's only confused as she does not know who to trust. ...read more.

Conclusion

And the audience is technically witnessing Eddie cause his own death. I personally think this scene is the most intense scene of all. Eddies second visit to Alfieri is more revealing to the audience, because Alfieri gives us more information about Eddies true feelings for Catherine by his judgements-"I will never forget how dark the room became when he looked at me; his eyes were like tunnels", Alfieri briefly explains how Eddie is feeling, he is informing us that Eddie is unaware of incestuous feelings which has effected his mental,emotional and also physical stability. The audience empathise with Eddie, as Arthur Miller uses stage direction with such effect and suspense, the audience can partially communicate with Eddie. I Personally think the audience will expect Eddie to forgive and Let go of Catherine at the end of act two, as the play has been an extremely tense, incestuous drama, therefore the audience will think that the ending will end in happiness and forgiveness. Throughout Arthur Miller's "A view from the bridge" we have learnt many dramatic techniques he used to build up tension. The consist of; Stage directions, Greek tragedy, Foregrounding, Scenery, Actions such as tension and climax and finally Dramatic irony. All these techniques, have included the audience in the life of Eddie Carbone and his family with such effect. At the end of the drama, Eddie Carbone dies by being stabbed by Marco. The dramatic techniques were used to prepare us for the major climax of the fatal ending. Anita Vitija 10LN, Ms Qasim-Hodder ...read more.

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