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A View from the Bridge

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Introduction

Explore the way Arthur Miller writes about justice in "A View from the Bridge". Write about the characters' search for justice and their feelings that the law is inadequate. "A View from the Bridge", by Arthur Miller, is based in an immigrant society, called Red Hook, and is rooted in the late 1940's. Red Hook is a "slum that faces the bay on the seaward side of Brooklyn Bridge". Arthur Miller highlights different characters' views on the law and justice and the way these beliefs conflict between life in America and in Sicily. Throughout the play Alfieri, a lawyer, provides a balanced point of view on the law. The play opens with a monologue from Alfieri, which informs the audience about the law and justice system. In Sicily "the law has not been a friendly idea since the Greeks were beaten". This indicates that the law has deep historical origins and appears to be grand. Alfieri talks about when he first came to America, when the state law had little hold over people, such as "Al Capone", and justice was sought out personally. However, during the time of the play state law had to be obeyed and personal justice sometimes ignored, "now we are quite civilized, quite American". ...read more.

Middle

His purpose is to work and send money home to his family, who live in poor conditions, "They eat the sunshine", "I send everything". Marco finds the way Eddie treats Rodolfo unjust. Marco enforces his dominance over Eddie at the end of the first act by proving his greater strength when he lifts the chair with one hand. This is Marco's message to Eddie that he should stop mistreating Rodolfo. However, Eddie ignores this and eventually rings the immigration bureau. In accordance with the Sicilian code of honour Marco wants to gain justice against Eddie by killing him. When Marco calls Eddie "Animal!" it shows how much he hates him, which reflects how deeply he believes in Eddie's injustice towards Rodolfo. Marco's feelings that he must seek vengeance may seem unnecessary. However, when it's put into the context that that is how he was brought up to think, it seems more reasonable. I believe that Marco's demands for justice are more justified than Eddie's. Marco's wishes to work and for him and Rodolfo to be treated justly are natural and fair demands. However, it is not right for Eddie to seek what he believe is his justice, because Eddie's sexual desire for Catherine defies natural law and is abnormal. ...read more.

Conclusion

Catherine was able to move forward. This was because Eddie died, which allowed her the freedom to seek justice. She did not have a vendetta against Marco for the role he had to play in Eddie's death, which enabled her to move on. Beatrice compromises when Rodolfo comes to warn Eddie about Marco, as she understands that Rodolfo is compromising as well. This is shown when she says, "Eddie, he's apologizing!" Although she loses her husband, she has a future ahead of her, because she is able to compromise. Eddie and Marco are the "losers" in the play. Eddie dies so has no future at all. Marco ruins any chance of working well in America by killing Eddie and is deported Miller wrote this modern tragedy to question the American government's moral authority, and possibly other governments too. This is linked to people's feeling that the law is inadequate, potentially due to their failure in finding justice. I think that he believed that the American government was inadequate, as it worked with legal authority and not moral authority. Perhaps he had experienced or known someone else who experienced moral injustice by the state laws. I think that Miller succeeded in his purpose in writing the play. I found the story and emotional tragedy interesting and exciting, but I admire him more for the subtext he created, which made me question the British governments adequacy and the justice that I seek. ...read more.

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