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A View From the Bridge

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Introduction

The play 'A view from the bridge' is basically about how Miller had wanted to create a play that would simply tell the tale he himself has heard. The play is set in Red Hook, a slum area, in Brooklyn in the 1950s. Alfieri views the drama from the Brooklyn Bridge and therefore decided to call the play 'A view from the Bridge'. In Eddie Carbone, Miller creates just such a representative type. He is a very ordinary man, decent, hard-working and charitable, a man no-one could dislike. But, like the protagonist of the ancient drama, he has a flaw or weakness. This, in turn, causes him to act wrongly. The consequences, social and psychological, of his wrong action destroy him. Alfieri then explains why it is better to "be civilised" and "settle for half", therefore restoring the normal moral order of the universe. As Eddie chose not to settle for half; he brought fate upon himself. When the other characters do not conform to his ideas of manliness it leads to conflict as the case with Roldalpho. Conflict also results when a character, namely Marco, does demonstrate conventionally 'masculine' characteristics in such a way as to make Eddie feel threatened. Clearly, Eddie is, in the classical Greek sense, the hero of the play. ...read more.

Middle

The failure of this in turn causes him to betray Rodolpho and Marco, a futile gesture, as Rodolpho is allowed to stay. Indeed, his marriage to Catherine is brought forward to secure his staying in the country. This general outline of Eddie's declining fortune in the play can now be seen in more detail. When Eddie meets the brothers he is friendly to both, but he warms quickly to Marco, a man's man, and superficially like Eddie. When Marco "raises a hand to hush" Rodolpho we read that Eddie "is coming more and more to address Marco only". He is made uneasy by the talkative young man with his unusual blond hair. In the play Marco is an initially reserved, serious, intense, passionate and bitter character. Eddie will seek to discredit any rival. In Rodolpho's case, he quickly finds a "reason" for this. Rodolpho is slightly-built, blond, a good singer and dancer, and he can cook and make dresses. He is also lively, witty, speaking in his second language, entertaining, able to gain interest easily. Moreover, Mike and Louis seem to share this view: "He comes around, everybody's laughin' ," says Mike. The stage directions indicate seven times that Mike and Louis laugh; finally, they "explode in laughter". After this, Eddie abuses his trust as a wise father-figure to persuade Catherine that Rodolpho is a "hit-and-run guy" and "only bowin' to his passport". ...read more.

Conclusion

And this is what Alfieri introduces to at the play's opening: the sight of a man destroying himself, while those around him are as powerless as the audience prevent it. This is partially how Eddie brought fate upon himself by letting his overacting take over him and his kind character. Marco's accusation of Eddie leads him, in the latter stages of the play, to an impossible effort to recover his good name in the community. In his doomed attempt to force Marco to take back his accusation, Eddie dies. We have considered Eddie in terms of what he does and says, but we should also consider how we are meant, finally, to see him. Through his character Alfiery Miller brings across the following themes jealousy, revenge, hate, love, envy and fate. The characters are his devices to convey the themes of the play in a way that would interest the audience. The last of the scenes plays a vital role. The reason this scene was included was to add the trgedy in the play, another thing that miller does is confirm the downfall of a great man. Once a decent man, down to earth and good principled gone corrupt due to the evils of jealousy in the end meets his end. Indirectly he sends across the message that despite the stereo types; America is still not as great as it is portrayed. Sidra Hafeez English Coursework ...read more.

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