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A View from the bridge

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Introduction

GCSE Coursework - Modern Drama "A View from the Bridge" by Arthur Miller How does Miller create the feeling in the audience of "A View from the Bridge" that the tragedy is inevitable? In this essay I will explain how Arthur Miller creates the feeling that a tragedy is inevitable. The impending tragedy becomes more and more apparent towards the end of the play, as there are more hints to suggest this fact. I will explain how Eddie's incestuous desire for his niece Catherine, how Eddie's relationship with his illegal immigrant cousins-in-law, Marco and Rodolfo and how Eddie is portrayed as a "good man", bring about his downfall. Alfieri plays the 'chorus' who tells the story of "A View from the Bridge" in a series of flashbacks through a first person narrative, which prompts the end of one scene and beginning of another. Through this technique Miller has created a perspective that serves to enhance the sense of tragedy that develops as the play progresses. In Alfieri's first speech the tragedy theme is revealed through a series of hints, one of which says, "sat there as powerless as I, and watched it run its bloody course", which gives the impression that the following events are inevitable, as he has no power to prevent them happening. ...read more.

Middle

The implication to the others is that he knows what he is talking about. When Eddie said "you understand me, don't you Marco?" and Marco replied saying "I beg your pardon", it suggests that Marco didn't agree with what he was saying which surprised Eddie, as he is used to being agreed with, being the man of the house. Therefore, when Marco disagreed with him, Eddie was quite shocked, this is revealed by "there is a pause, an awkwardness". Marco had used Eddies own techniques of reinforcing superiority against him. This shows that Marco will play a significant part in the inevitable tragedy at the end, as Marco made Eddie look stupid, therefore Eddie will want to seek retribution. Taking out his frustration on Rodolfo, by making comments that degrade and belittle him, helps Eddie deal with his incestuous desire for his niece, Catherine. He insinuates Rodolfo is homosexual by saying, "Its wonderful. He sings, he cooks, he could make dresses..." and "he ain't right". It is this frivolous, feminine attitude that makes him attractive to Catherine but Eddie cannot see how Rodolfo is interested in Catherine, believing he just wants to marry her in order to gain American citizenship. This presumption makes Eddie feel it is his duty to protect her from getting hurt, thus making his obsession even worse, so he thinks the only way is to get rid of Marco and Rodolfo. ...read more.

Conclusion

Marco thought that Eddie may want to apologise to him, but Eddie suffers from excessive pride, hubris a vital element of a tragedy so he would not apologise, as it would hurt his pride. When Marco and Rodolfo came back to go to the wedding, Eddie thought that Marco would come back and apologise to him for losing his respect, but he didn't. A fight brakes out and Eddie "springs a knife into his hand" and Marco uses self-defence to and Eddie stabs himself. This shows that by holding the blade that killed him, he has sealed his own fate and he is responsible for his own doing, but he was only following the law and he died for it. As Eddie is a devout catholic, he hadn't been given the last rights and hadn't confessed his sins before he died, so he would go to hell. However, Eddie Carbone was not a just a possessive uncle with incestuous desires, he was "as good a man as he had to be in a life that was hard and even. He worked on the piers when there was work, he brought home his pay, and he lived." But now as a result of his hubris he was going to hell. A fitting end to a tragic play. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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