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A view from the bridge: arthur miller

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Introduction

Rickie hurlstone 10vc english coursework25/10/02 a view from the bridge: arthur miller Arthur Miller wrote A View from the Bridge in 1955. The structure of this play is relatively uncomplicated. It is set in the late 1940's amidst the Sicilian community in Brooklyn, New York. It is supposed to be modern version of a Greek tragedy with its powerful speeches and references to fate. A lawyer, Alfieri re-tells his account as he oversees the events that take place. The play is in two acts, but careful discussions by Alfieri help the audience to reflect on the events that have just hapened. The title of the play is based on the Brooklyn Bridge and Alfieri having a view from on top of it. Since this play is supposed to be a modern version of a Greek tragedy, tragic events take place throughout the play. The concept of approaching tragedy is something that is threatening to happen, and throughout this essay, I will go into depth about how Arthur Miller created this atmosphere through his written language and stage directions. This thrilling and tragic drama is about love, jealousy and betrayal. Alfieri is a lawyer who works for the Sicilian community in Brooklyn. He opens the play with a very revealing account of what life used to be like and what it is really like in that particular community.He launches into clear detail about past outlaws and murders and about how justice is very important to the Italians. ...read more.

Middle

In the next section, Beatrice confronts Eddie about not causing a scene when Catherine and Rodolpho come home from a date. It is at this point that Eddie voices his concern that Rodolpho is actualy homosexual by his blond hair and the fact that he can sing. Beatrice then has her say about her concern for her marriage. The sexual side of their relationship had gone bad and Beatrice is concerned because she suspects Eddie has sexual feelings for Catherine. Beatrice has no luck with Eddie over their relationship or over Catherine. A conversation with two of his friends backs up Eddie's thoughts about Rodolpho's sexuality. When they meet, Rodolpho tries to make conversation with Eddie, but he is hesitant and insists that he needs to talk to Catherine. Affectionately calling her Katie, Eddie uses his familiar emotional approach, which is sensitive to Catherine's emotions. He suggests that all he is doing is looking out for her interests. He uses her inexperience to put down her arguments harshly. Eddie then tells her that Rodolpho is only 'goin' with her,' for his American passport. Catherine sobs and Eddie is alarmed and does not understand why Catherine does not agree with him. Eddie orders Beatrice to 'see' to Catherine. This is when Beatrice tells Catherine that Eddie may have alternative feelings for her. Up until now, Catherine thought that the world was a lovely place and now the security of home has been shattered. Catherine now realises that she is going to have to defend herself and no one else can do it for her. ...read more.

Conclusion

Eddie is evil towards Rodolpho because he is jealous of the chemistry between the younger ones. Eddie unsuccessfuly does his best to get rid of Rodolpho. He sees him as a homosexual who is using Catherine to get an American passport. Catherine is attempting to be independent but she cannot stand up to Eddie. Catherine sees Rodolpho and immediately expresses to him in different words how handsome and attractive he is. She does not believe in hiding her emotions for another person. When Beatrice warns Catherine about Eddie's alternative feelings and about how she is provoking them by walking around in her underwear she is shocked and this changes her considerabily. I also believe that it increases her love for Rodolpho as she realises that she has to protect the love that matters to her. Catherine has to go through a process that should have been performed gradually in a matter of a few months. She now has something to be independent about and she can trust herself to make the right decisions because she cannot trust Eddie anymore. Just as Eddie is passionate about getting what he wants and what he thinks is right; Catherine defends what she loves. The doom in this play starts at the very beginning with Eddie's outward and awkward feeling for Catherine, when he claims her as his own. The prospect of dooms mounts as the play goes on, but the main factor is that the play is about incestuous love, jealousy and betrayal. When these are combined with an underprivileged, passionate Italian way of life, the results are harsh. rickie hurlstone english coursework 12/11/02 ...read more.

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