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A view from the bridge - Does the character of Eddie Carbone cause his on fate?

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Does the character of Eddie Carbone Cause his on fate? This piece of coursework is based around the character of Eddie Carbone from Arthur Miller's, 'A View From The Bridge.' Miller wanted to create 'a phenomenon, a rather awesome fact of existence', which indeed he did. Eddie Carbone is the tragic protagonist of ' A View From The Bridge'. He is constantly self-interested, wanting to promote and protect his innocence. Eddie creates a fictional fantasy world where his absurd decisions make sense. In his world, he imagines protecting Catherine from marriage or any male relationship and wants her for himself. While Eddie wavers and switches between communal and state laws and cultures, his motivations do not change. I.e. he welcomes Rodolpho and Marco into his home and then reports them to the immigration. Eddie constantly looks out for himself at the expense of others and is rules by personal love and guilt. In this piece of coursework I will discuss the question and raise points which both support and challenge the view that Eddie Carbone causes his own fate. ...read more.


He still saw her as a baby. He wouldn't let her live her own life and at first he wouldn't let her have her first job. Due to not letting her grow up, this led her to go to Rodolpho more quickly than she would have if he had let her grow up. Eddie thinks that Rodolpho is, 'laughin' at her and he's laughin' at me.' Eddie begins to become really desperate, 'Katie, don't break my heart, listen to me.' He doesn't want her to marry Rodolpho or leave town, and because she doesn't listen to him and says that the wedding is going ahead on the Saturday he becomes very frustrated, he says to Rodolpho, 'Pack it up. Go ahead. Get your stuff and get outa here.' Eddie was determined to split Catherine and Rodolpho up and prevent them from marrying. He tried to portray that Rodolpho was homosexual. He did this with comments such as, 'And with that wacky hair; he's like a chorus girl or sump'm.' ...read more.


This suppression is what devastates Eddie.' Because he has no outlet for his feelings-even in his own conscious mind-Eddie transfers his energy to a hatred of Marco and Rodolpho and causes him to act completely irrationally. Eddie's final need to secure or retrieve his good name from Marco is a result of Eddie's failure to protect Catherine from Marco. Eddie fails in his life, but seeks redemption and victory in death. By avenging Marco, 'Eddie believes he will regain his pride in the community-another wholly self-interested act. Eddie escaped restraint because he escaped all thoughts of other people or the community at large. Eddie's "wholeness" is a whole interest in himself. Eddie's tragic flaw is the bubble, the constructed world he exists within, but is unable to escape or recognise.' I feel Eddie is ultimately to blame for his own death, but the events leading up to his demise were most certainly not helped by the other characters. For example, if Rodolpho had asked Eddie's permission to marry Catherine, perhaps his death wouldn't have occurred and Catherine and himself wouldn't have grown apart the way they did. Nicki Jones 10 L ...read more.

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