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A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE Explore the dramatic significance of Act One (pages 22 to 24) and the effect it might have on the audience

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This scene takes place a few weeks after Marco and Rodolfo are first introduced into the play. The last scene has a climatic ending with recognition of apparent sexual attraction between Rodolfo and Catherine. In this scene, it appears that the two young characters have developed a liaison and intimacy, much to Eddie's chagrin. This selected scene reveals to the audience not only the development of a romance between Rodolfo and Catherine but also the start of the deterioration of Eddie and Beatrice's relationship as a result of Eddie's affection for Catherine. The scene like many within the play, is introduced by Alfieri who pronounces: "Eddie Carbone never expected to have a destiny" (P22) thereby implying Eddie's imminent downfall, similar to other protagonists found in Greek tragedies. However, as this is a modern tragedy, no one character is particularly corrupt. Indeed, they are just ordinary people. As confirmed in Alfieri's speech as he asserts: "A man works, raises his family, goes bowling..." (P22) Yet even inconsequential individuals can have extraordinary lives, and Miller encapsulates this in the play through the perceptive Chorus of Alfieri. Marco and Rodolfo who arrived at the Carbone household a few weeks prior to events occurring in this scene, are beginning to sense Eddie's distress. ...read more.


It becomes obvious as to what his fatal flaw is. The role of Eddie is directed to be aggressive in order to attempt to conceal his inner anguish. Eddie "looks away" from Beatrice several times during their encounter, suggesting that he is ashamed of his feelings and obsession. His actions also reflect his growing disinterest in Beatrice, his wife, which mixed with his expanding interest in their niece creates a highly complex and dangerous situation. Nonetheless, Beatrice acts as the good wife and "smiles" at him when she catches sight of him. Despite this, Eddie looks away which emphasizes tension as it illuminates that there is some unease on Eddie's part. Beatrice then continues to try and keep the mood light whilst avoiding the words she would have liked to say about her husband's inappropriate affections. Miller directs her role to be more assertive causing the tension to rise further as what she is saying puts Eddie in a increasingly awkward state. Miller's range of language devices in the play effectively bring out both character and theme. Alfieri's language includes the dialogue spoken by an educated man critically aware of the tragic situation that is unraveling: "Who can ever know what will be discovered?" ...read more.


This conversation leads Eddie to lose his composure, "I can't talk about it," perhaps showing that he doesn't even know himself. Still, the audience realizes that perhaps Beatrice knows that Eddie is heading for a terrible fall. His feelings are totally misplaced and his obsession for Catherine blurs reality. She tells Eddie angrily that she wants him to "Cut it out now" and come inside however he is too obsessed with Catherine and unable to redirect his actions or feelings. To conclude, this scene is important as it subtly reveals Eddie's emotional determination whilst disclosing the gap forming between the characters and is the first time Eddie's obsession is mentioned explicitly. The audience's sympathies lie with all the characters in this drama as they are all affected by Eddie's fatal flaw, especifically Beatrice and her angst as a consequence of Eddie's fixation. A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE Explore the dramatic significance of Act One (pages 22 to 24) and the effect it might have on the audience 01-06-10 A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE Explore the dramatic significance of Act One (pages 22 to 24) and the effect it might have on the audience 01-06-10 A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE Explore the dramatic significance of Act One (pages 22 to 24) and the effect it might have on the audience Amelia Kelly 01-06-10 HW ...read more.

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