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ACT 1 scene 5. Intro : In act 1 scene 4, Macbeth had in interview with King Duncan who, ironically, praised him for his

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Introduction

Text 2 : ACT 1 scene 5. Intro : In act 1 scene 4, Macbeth had in interview with King Duncan who, ironically, praised him for his courarage and faithfulness, and thus promised him to visit his castle of Inverness that night. Scene 5 is the reader's first encounter with Lady Macbeth. Lady Macbeth has just finished reading a letter from her husband describing his first encounter with the witches. Contrasting with Macbeth's first soliloquy (scene 3) where he expresses his fears and doubts at the perspective announced by the witches, Lady Macbeth's soliloquy depicts her as a merciful, unhuman and evil character who would do anything to quench her thirst of power. To start with we shall analyse Lady Macbeth's vision of gender roles and her conscious transgression of the norms of feminity. In a second and final step we shall see how this soliloquy turns Lady Macbeth into the incarnation of evil itself. Dev : A- Genre Role : Throughout the soliloquy, Lady Macbeth uses stereotypes of masculine/feminine roles to characterise her husband's weakness, and her own desire to be strong enough for two. ...read more.

Middle

Therefore what we have here is the clich´┐Ż that man inherited his weakness from good but impressionable Adam and woman inherited her power of pursuasion, cunning and thirst for power from Eve. Yet if Lady Macbeth accepts the calculating and cunning side that women got from Eve, she rejects with utter disgust precisely what caracterises most the woman that is motherhood. On line 29 she asks to be " unsexed " and on L34 and 35 she wants the evil spirit to " come to my woman's breast and take my milk for gall ". In other words she precisely asks to have her feminine attibutes " sex " and " breast " removed to make her less of a loving mother and more of a pitiless men or, as we shall see now, monster. B- The transformation : The transformation actually starts on L29. Yet the transformation way well have begun on L25 ; more than just a parallel with Eve, Lady Macbeth reminds us of the very amblem of evil, that is the snake, which actually spoke softly into Eve's ear so as to make her convince Adam, just like the snake she wants to " pour my spirits ...read more.

Conclusion

" fatal entrance " " thick night " " my keen knife " " smoke of hell " There is a true dramatic effect achieved by the tone, the lexical field and the alliterations in " m " (L35) as well as the [i] assonance " keep peace between th' effect and it " (L34). Assuredly, this scene has a dramatic and frightening quality for the audience. Conclu : Probably nowhere else in the play is the character of Lady Macbeth better depicted. Here we are shown a cold-blooded woman, eager for power who is ready to do anything to see her weak and too-human husband usurp the thone of Scotland. In order to achieve her aim, Lady Macbeth must cumulate the cunning of Eve and the cruelty, the ruthlessness of evil itself. The supernatural elements displayed with a dramatic eloquance by Lady Macbeth adds to her strength to the point that she no longer seems human. The audience is now prepared for the monstruous deed to come and no doubt that if a weak and doubtful Macbeth can find some compassion to the eyes of the spectator , such an evil and unnatural character as Lady Macbeth never will . ...read more.

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