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Act 3 Scene 1 is a turning point in the play - Analyze this scene paying particular attention to character and draft.

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Introduction

Act 3 Scene 1 is a turning point in the play. Analyze this scene paying particular attention to character and draft The play 'Romeo and Juliet' by William Shakespeare is about two young people from different families. Romeo is a Montague and Juliet a Capulet. They live their romance secretly so the feud between the families would not get out of hand. Romeo and Juliet clearly end sadly. In this play the tragedy is more about the struggle of two young people to escape from the difficulties of the hostile world in which they live in and from the bands of fate that seem to blind them. As the play goes on we can see that their struggle is doomed to failure; we can see; but they cannot, and that is their tragedy. Most of Shakespeare's plays end in tragedy and Romeo and Juliet is just one of them. The chorus is there to let the audience know from the beginning that there is going to be a bad ending where it says "from ancient grudge break to new muting," that means that old grudges cause new problems. ...read more.

Middle

In Act 3, Scene One, the weather sets the scene because it says, "the day is hot" and the heat makes them very agitated. Mercutio tries to cause an argument by saying "Thou art like one of these fellows that when he enters the confires of a tavern, claps his sword upon the table and says "God send me no need of thee!" He is saying the Benvolio argues over little things. He is also saying that he is quarrelsome when he says, "they head is as full of quarrels as an egg is full of meat; and yet they head hath been beaten as." This is ironic because it is Mercutio that actually behaves in this way. Romeo knows that Tybalt wants a fight when he says, "follow me close, for I will speak to them. Gentlemen, good e'en! A word with one of you." But when Tybalt says "you shall find me apt enough to that sir, and you will give me occasion." ...read more.

Conclusion

He is also angry because he has been criticizing him, "with Tybalt's slander." Also he won't fight because he is in love with Juliet and this has made him not so violent, "O sweet Juliet! Thy beauty hath made me effeminate." Romeo appears to have no control over this life, "this day's black fate on mo days doth depend; this but begins the woe others must end." This is a turning point in the play for Romeo because he is upset after Mercutio's death and he is angry because Tybalt has killed him. In the next section of this scene we see prince and how he is ready to believe himself, "where are the vile beginners of this fray" he says this to Benvolio. Lady Capulet's response is for more vicious and she is seeking for revenge, "husband, o, the blood is spilled." The audience feels tension. At the end of this scene the prince says, "immediately we do exile him hence" this is referring back to the beginning where they are star-crossed lovers and they are not meant to be together and their love seems to be impossible now Romeo has killed Tybalt and is banished from Verona. Ashley Sewell ...read more.

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