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Act 5 scene 2 of the play 'Othello'.

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In act 5 scene 2 of the play 'Othello', we witness Othello killing his wife Desdemona because Iago tricked him into believing that she was committing adultery. Throughout the play Iago fooled Othello into believing that his wife was cheating on him, this story line climaxes in this final scene when Othello kills Desdemona then takes his own life in remorse. After reading William Shakespeare's classic, wrote in the 19th century, I watched Oliver Parkers film adaptation (1995). The lighting, costumes, camera shots, music, scenery and actors were all used to great effect to portray the drama that ensued in the film. As in all film adaptations there are many differences to the story line, mainly because the script describing what is going on in the background is not needed in a film as we can see what is going on. This is illustrated in lines 20-22 as they are omitted because they are unnecessary due to the close up shots, which clearly show Othello weeping. There are many uses of lighting in a film. ...read more.


For example after line 73 Oliver Parker inserts line 128-129 from Act 5 Scene 1. In the film Othello roughly throws Desdemona back onto the bed, (line 78 in the text). Again the eerie, haunting music begins signalling impending doom. Shakespeare does not describe Desdemona fighting back. Parker, however, seems to suggest that she simply wasn't a passive victim. The first climax in Act 5 Scene 2 is Othello smothering his poor bride. It is a most powerful heart-wrenching scene to watch. Here Parker strikingly uses the close-up technique to its fullest advantage as we see the whites of Othello's eyes whilst suffocating his wife, clearly displaying his distress and angst. Another powerful image is one of Desdemona white hand lovingly covering the head of her murderer, followed by a hunting close up of Othello's tear stained face. In line 140, haunting music returns as Emilia realises that Iago has lied about Desdemona's behaviour to Othello, resulting in her untimely death. ...read more.


We watch Iago join Desdemona Emilia and Othello on the bed; this possibly shows his regreat. He stares at the camera as if questioning the audience. Hope is symbolised by Cassio opening the shutters whereupon light enters the room, bathing the characters. Parker has also added a scene showing Othello and Desdemona being berried at sea against a glorious deep red sunset. This is symbolic of the passion that existed through the two characters. This clip is particularly powerful as it can be associated with an earlier seen showing Iago throwing too chess pawns, one black and the other white into a well. A pawn is the least valuable chess pieces in a chess game. This symbolises how Othello and Desdemona where both pawns in Iago's game. Parker also uses the effect of costumes to add to the film. Desdemona is wearing a white nightdress, which is symbolic of her purity. Othello is wearing a white hooded cloak, which also shows his innocence in Iago's game. He is also wearing a lot of jewellery symbolising his wealth. Iago is wearing a dark brown outfit throughout the film unlike his personality, which changes constantly. ...read more.

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