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An analysis of the contribution that Inspector Goole makes to the dramatic impact of 'An Inspector Calls' by J.B. Priestly.

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Introduction

An analysis of the contribution that Inspector Goole makes to the dramatic impact of 'An Inspector Calls' by J.B. Priestly Whitehaven Brook lane Botley So'ton Hants ENGLAND 29th May 03 Bond Mansion Star Avenue Hollywood California AMERICA Dear Mr. Connery, Congratulations! You have been selected for the role of Inspector Goole in the play 'An Inspector Calls', written by J.B. Priestly in 1944. The character you will be playing is not a very easy one, many challenges await you as you develop this character. J.B. Priestly uses the idea of representation very well in this play, the Birling family represent Britain in both 1912 and in 1944. The Birlings are ignorant of the problems with society and only care about their own wealth and power. The play is set in 1912, shortly before the Titanic's maiden voyage. Mr. Priestly thinks there is relevance between 1912 and 1944; because of civil, religious and political disorder. The selection has been made from thousands of applicants and our panel of esteemed judges has handpicked you. You will be playing alongside some of the finest actors in the world. ...read more.

Middle

him around his little finger eventually leading him to steal money from his father, to give to her, and then promptly says that she doesn't want to see him again. Your character, Inspector Goole, can be interpreted in many different ways. He could be the family's conscience, he makes them feel bad and their guilt becomes more apparent as the play progresses. He can be the voice of the author, commentating on the family, as they are said to represent Britain in the periods that it was both written, and set in. As the play comes to a conclusion we find that the Inspector wasn't an Inspector at all; he may have been a prophet, foretelling of things to come, or as a method of torture to scare the family into admitting their crimes before the real Inspector gets there. The name 'Goole' suggests that he is a ghostly figure of some sort living in the spirit world. The characterisation you choose to use is completely up to you, because it is so open to interpretation, this is why the character is so hard to play. ...read more.

Conclusion

As the Inspector sees it, Eric drinks because of his guilt and if the Inspector lead him on any more then he would have another suicide case on his hands. Mr. Birling becomes very angry with Eric when he is confessing (because he stole the money), but the Inspector stops Mr. Birling because all he wants to hear is the truth, he doesn't care about how much trouble Eric is in with his father. When the Inspector arrives on the scene he immediately makes a dramatic impact on the quiet and peaceful scene. Your costume will include a dark suit of the period, with a bow tie and a brown coloured trench coat over the top. You will wear a hat, take it off when you arrive on the scene and then put it back on when leaving. You will act coolly and calmly throughout the play, adding touches of emotion during your last monologue. I hope that you enjoy playing the role of the Inspector in our fine play, and we look forward to any contributions that you make to the dramatic effect of the play, thank you. Yours Faithfully, Alex Worley ...read more.

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