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An analysis of 'The Lost World' by Arthur Conan Doyle

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Introduction

An analysis of 'The Lost World' by Arthur Conan Doyle 'TLW' was written in 1912 and was set in the author's present. This novel falls under an adventure/exploration genre. Usually in an adventure or an exploration novel the following takes place; the story is usually set in the present, the story is driven by a quest, which comes out of wanting to find evidence to support a theory, the hero is established, and whilst the quest is also recognized, the hero faces a series of challenges and eventually finds the evidence on the way to becoming successful in what he is set to do. One thing which is usual in this type of genre is a villain who is generally a person but in this novel, the danger is posed by the extremities of nature such as the cliffs, rocks, dinosaurs and even the natives. 'TLW' was first published serially in the Strand Magazine between April and November of 1912 and in the Philadelphia Press Sunday Magazine between March and July of 1912. This is the reason for each chapter ending in a cliffhanger. It was first published in book form by Hodder and Stoughton in October of 1912. Whilst writing this novel Conan Doyle told his editor "my ambition is to do for the boy's book what Sherlock Holmes did for the detective tale". ...read more.

Middle

Just as young Malone has accepted it and so have we. An idea in 'TLW' is that sometimes even the most implausible theory can be sometimes true. At first glance the dinosaur's existence seemed completely impossible but towards the end turned out to be true. The fact that the motives of the characters are altruistic and that they are not concerned with making money from their discoveries shows that they are not selfish people. The other theme which has a big contrast between both novels is the importance of investment in science and development. When 'TLW' was written there was far less development in science. There are heroes in both novels. Ned Malone who works for the Daily Gazette is the hero in 'TLW', he is madly in love with a woman called Gladys who he describes as 'full of every womanly quality' but in return she does not love him (unrequited love) 'I'm in love with somebody else'. He thinks that if the able to show his heroic qualities to Gladys she may love him back. He will do anything, whilst speaking to McArdle (his newspaper editor) about him being allowed to go on mission which will have a 'bit of adventure of danger in it' he says he needs a mission 'To justify my life, sir' Malone is a typical man of the early twentieth century. ...read more.

Conclusion

Professor Challenger's theory is proven and he celebrates a victory in the resolution of 'The Lost World'. None of the characters have died during their expedition and have returned safely, unlike in 'Jurassic Park'. Malone returns to find that Gladys has married someone else so he chooses to go back to the 'lost world' with Lord John Roxton. At the end, Professor Challenger's quest turns out to be a successful one which In 'TLW' there are four main characters. They are Professor Challenger, Edward Malone, Mr Summerlee, and Lord John Roxton. First of all Professor Challenger 'TLW' portrays the women in the novel as expected in the early twentieth century The Lost World the hero Edward Malone, known informally as Ned, undertakes the exploration because he believes that if he shows heroic qualities, the woman of his dreams, Gladys will fall in love with him. This shows the naivety of his character that may represent the state of all men when they are in love. This idea is supported when he and the other men return from the midst of the Amazon and she has already wed somebody else as shown when Conan Doyle writes; 'Gladys!' I cried. 'What is the matter? You are my Gladys, are you not- little Gladys Hungerton?' 'No' said she, 'I am Gladys Potts, Let me introduce you to my husband.' ...read more.

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