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An Essay on Juliet's Soliloquy in Act IV, Scene 3 - Romeo and Juliet.

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Introduction

An Essay on Juliet's Soliloquy in Act IV, Scene 3 Juliet's soliloquy is to be found in the middle of Act IV, after Scene 2, in which the Capulets are preparing for Juliet and Paris's wedding and Juliet and the Friar are preparing for her "death". I believe that this soliloquy can be divided into three parts, the first of which shows us Juliet's maturity developing. This is clearly portrayed when Juliet decides that she doesn't need to confide in the Nurse anymore and is brave enough to act alone. "Nurse! - What should she do here? My dismal scene I needs must act alone." It is likely that Juliet's confidence is resting upon the fact that the plan is simply a performance, which is suggested when she says "act alone". ...read more.

Middle

Another possibility is that Juliet is "playing" with the reputation of the Capulets. In the third part Juliet imagines Tybalt's ghost crying for revenge on Romeo and this seems to jolt her back to reality. In this reality, Juliet acts quickly and drinks the poison out of pure love for Romeo. In this part it seems that Juliet is back to being a mature, quick thinker. It's interesting to observe how with time, both Romeo and Juliet start denying help of others and start depending on themselves. In this soliloquy Juliet first dismisses the Nurse, and then begins doubting the Friar's intentions, as revealed in this quote. "What if it be a poison which the Friar Subtly hath ministered to have me dead," Juliet uses temperature metaphors, such as "I have a faint cold fear" and "freezes up the ...read more.

Conclusion

Juliet personifies the vault, saying that it has a "foul mouth" in which "no healthsome air breathes in". This is similar to Act V, Scene 3 in which Romeo also compares the vault to a monster and talks about it's rotten mouth (Thou detestable maw," and "I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,"). It is perhaps surprising that Juliet sends away the Nurse, on pretenses that she has to pray, shown in this quote: "I have need of many orisons" However, Juliet doesn't pray, despite of the task at hand. Juliet simply addresses her fears about the potion not working, or the Friar trying to poison her or Romeo not being in the tomb when she wakes up. This can perhaps reveal that Juliet is quite confident in her plan working, because of the fact that she doesn't pray. ...read more.

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