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An Inspector Calls - A Review - With the outside of the house set in the 1940's and the inside of the house set in 1912, the director Stephen Daldry vividly and cleverly links the two time settings together in the play.

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Introduction

An Inspector Calls - A Review With the outside of the house set in the 1940's and the inside of the house set in 1912, the director Stephen Daldry vividly and cleverly links the two time settings together in the play. When I saw the stage for the first time, I wondered as to how a house and surroundings would all be able to fit because I felt that the stage was a bit smaller in size than I initially thought. When the play started off with three young children wandering about the stage I didn't understand what their purpose in the play would be, that is until the end. On the stage, as the curtains lifted, I saw what seemed like a blown up doll's house perched upon wooden stilts with a light on. From inside I could hear jovial laughter and the sound of voices. Immediately I had the frightening thought that the whole play would be set inside that room in the house with only us, as the audience being able to listen and not see. ...read more.

Middle

He came out onto the balcony followed by his daughter's fianc� Gerald and then his son Eric. In the midst of Mr Birling's speech, the inspector arrived. Daldry had made the appearance of the inspector again just as I imagined him to be; mysterious, wearing a long coat and hat as if not to reveal himself too soon. The atmosphere was perplexing and the slow mystical music in the background added to the effect. Like Mr Birling, much of the characters were just as I thought they'd be like, however Mrs Birling (played by?) had more of a comedy character. When her turn came to be questioned by Inspector Goole, she walked and behaved like she was higher than the queen and her manner of speaking was extremely posh. Every so often the maid, Edna, moved a chair around for Mrs Birling to sit upon. But at the end after the family found that there wasn't a real inspector but then got the strange phone call, it was Edna who got the chair and sat on it herself which I felt showed the reversal of the roles. ...read more.

Conclusion

It was shocking to see the house at one stage in the play topple over but it soon went back up again when the Birling's realised that the inspector wasn't a real one after all. The costumes were also good; a posh Victorian gown for Mrs Birling, a white gown for Sheila and tuxedos for the gentlemen; it helped to set the scene. Overall the play was well structured and well made because it contained many factors which captivated and involved the audience. An example of involving the audience was when Sheila told her story of her encounter with Eva Smith. She told it as if she we the audience played the jury and she played the suspect. The use of climax kept us enthralled and captivated as it built up slowly, gathering the plot as it went on. Throughout each character's questioning we could only guess who the culprit was and each time I nearly sussed the culprit out, the inspector switched to another character for questioning, and it was this which engrossed me in the action that was happening on - stage. Prabhjit Kooner 11s Drama Coursework Review of An Inspector Calls 1 Coursework ...read more.

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