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An Inspector Calls Coursework

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Introduction

An Inspector Calls Coursework Question - How does J.B.Priestly use the character Inspector Goole to convey his own opinion and ideas? At the start of 'An Inspector Calls' The Birling family are celebrating a special occasion. After a many number of anecdotes and humorous statements there is a ring at the door. From here the play enters and anti-climatical state as the Inspector invades uninvitedly into the Birling's family home. Systematically Inspector Goole deprives all the members of the Birling family: Arthur, Sybil, Sheila, Eric and Gerald of their morals and the way they view life. By the inspector interrogating each character, the audience will find out that this rich family is not all that it seems and their pride and happiness in the beginning elusively keeps dark secrets hidden, which are unravelled gradually as the play progresses. J.B.Priestly created the play 'An Inspector Calls' to instigate the need of a social change and his concern about what the consequences of social inequality could do in Britain and the world. In 1942 Priestly helped to create a new political party, the Common Wealth Party that spread the ideas for public ownership of land, morality in politics and a greater democracy. ...read more.

Middle

J.B.Priestly created Mr Birling as a snobbish, self-centred, portentous, middle fifties aged man to instigate that there was a need for a social change as the high class and low class ideas were too separate. He wanted to attack the higher class as they thought that because they had a higher status than the lower class they have more rights, they don't have to have a sense of community as they could look after themselves with their money, they thought they had no problems of there own as they are rich and they were always right but J.B.Priestly portrays this by the example of Mr Birling saying that there will not be a world war and that the Titanic would not sink. Mr Burling represents the opposite of J.B.Priestly's ideas: the togetherness of a community and socialism. Mr Burling is shown to be right about the little things like him being interviewed by the press if his story escapes his house but his arrogance and pompousness makes him wrong about the important things like the Titanic (which can be used as a metaphor to show Mr Birling's status; sinkable which Inspector Goole makes possible) ...read more.

Conclusion

The younger generation have learned there lesson but the older generation has not as I have explained earlier. The relief of there not being a girl in the infirmary releases some tension in the play - but then the phone rings again announcing that the real inspector is coming to question them about the suicide of a girl dramatically restores tension leaving the play with an unanticipated twist. This is where the ones who have understood what the meaning of the visit by inspector Goole was about have nothing to worry about as they have already questioned their conscience and would have already learned their lesson (younger generation). The twist in the play causes the audience to ask many questions such as, who was the inspector? The inspector in the play-acted like a God like figure due to the way he had high authority and blamed each member of the Birling family for the things they did to make Eva Smith commit suicide "remember what you did!" When the Inspector says this he sounds like someone with high authority, like a judge or someone supernatural. The name Goole could be a play off word of ghoul, as the Inspector is not known of and has not ever been seen before. Leon Mcfarlane 10KRH English Coursework ...read more.

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