• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

An Inspector Calls - Show how the playwright uses Sheila Birling and Mr. Birling to reveal the disparities between social and moral attitudes of father and daughter.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

An Inspector Calls Coursework Show how the playwright uses Sheila Birling and Mr. Birling to reveal the disparities between social and moral attitudes of father and daughter. Explain how the director would make these disparities clear in a stage production of the play. There are numerous differences that are revealed between the characters of Miss Sheila Birling and Mr. Birling during the course of the play 'An Inspector Calls' ; Most Particularly between social and moral attitudes. In Act 1 Mr. Birling acts in a very self confident and smug way. He strongly believes in a capitalist world. You can tell this from his speech that begins; "A man has to make his own way - has to look after himself - and his family too, of course, when he has one - and so long as he does that he wont come to much harm" Mr. Birling says how he must look after himself, and then almost forgetting his family, as though they are an after thought, or a hindrance. Birling doesn't care how his actions affect others. "We were paying the usual rates and if they didn't like those rates, they could go and work somewhere else. It's a free country, I told them" This confirms to the audience that Mr. Birling is a harsh business man, out to make money in any way he can. ...read more.

Middle

Priestly portrays Sheila Birling, in Act 1, to be selfish, immature, and a 'daddy's girl'. Priestly uses Eric in Act 1 to show Sheila's immaturity; "Don't be an ass Eric". Sheila is acting immature but I think she is also trying to gain high opinion from her father; Mr. Birling is slightly suspicious of Eric, so Mr. Birling may like it that Sheila is being nasty to Eric, as Mr. Birling does not stop Sheila and Eric arguing, Mrs. Birling does. The playwright reveals to the audience that she is obsessed with material things; "Oh - it's wonderful! Look - mummy - isn't it a beauty? Oh - darling- (she kisses Gerald hastily)" Her moral attitude could be said to be very wrong, she is more interested in the ring than Gerald, she says how wonderful it is to her mother and then hastily kisses Gerald, like Gerald is simply an after thought, and that she feels that it is appropriate to kiss him, rather than she wanting to kiss him. The audience is further confronted with Sheila selfishness when the inspector describes the death of Ms. Eva Smith; "(rather distressed) Sorry! It's just that I can't help thinking about this girl destroying herself so horribly - and I've been so happy tonight. Oh I wish you hadn't of told me. What was she like? ...read more.

Conclusion

Birling's morals. "I behaved badly too. I know I did. I'm ashamed of it. But now you're beginning all over again to pretend that nothing much has happened" Sheila knows she has done something bad and is trying to make Birling see the same. She defiantly understands more of her social attitudes because she takes responsibility for her actions. I think Priestly wrote this play to undermine the upper-class and also all people in general and how sometimes people can think they are on top of the world, just like Mr. Birling in Act 1, and then suddenly can be knocked over, only because of their wrong doings in the past. For Mr. Birling it was 2 years before, for Sheila it was more recently. But the same applies to both of them, they both did some thing dreadful and didn't take responsibility and they didn't think of what they were really doing to poor Eva Smith. This resulted in the past catching up with them and they ended the play in a very bad situation. Mr. Birling still keeps his moral arrogance and so ignores the fact that he has done something bad. Whereas Sheila takes responsibility for her actions and finds new morals. Priestly overall message from the play is to think before you mess something up, and take responsibility for your actions. Priestly has made Mr. Birling's Moral arrogance obvious to the audience by using the Inspector to get the truth out of Mr. Birling. The Inspector reveals ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE J.B. Priestley section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE J.B. Priestley essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    An Inspector calls - Sheila and Mr. Birling.

    3 star(s)

    Whereas her father tries to put off the break up for obvious reasons. The questions that show there their involvement in the death of Eva shows a great distinction between their attitude to life and others not so high in society.

  2. "You and I aren't the same people who sat down together before dinner" Sheila ...

    The stage direction describes her as "very distressed� and she begins to moan "No - Eric - please - I didn't know...�. However, she soon recovers and joins Birling in condemning Eric, saying that "I'm absolutely ashamed of you� to him.

  1. Inspector Calls-How Sheila Birling Changes And Develops Through The Play

    'Yes go on mummy.' This proves that she is very childlike and still depends on her mother, she has lived a very sheltered life and wants her mother's approval for everything she does, and she is not independent. Even though Sheila is a grown woman she still has sibling rivalry with Eric.

  2. Compare and contrast the characters of Mr. Birling and Sheila Birling in their attitudes ...

    When he does ask why the Inspector has called, he becomes slightly impatient when the Inspector doesn't fully answer his question. He clearly feels he is more important than the Inspector. He then says, "Look - there's nothing mysterious - or scandalous - about this business - at least not so far as I'm concerned."

  1. The Inspector Says "We're all responsible for each other". Mr Birling Says "A man ...

    Until the inspector calls and upsets the mood. She is shown a picture of the aforementioned Eva Smith, and rushes out the room upset. She is involved with Eva's death because of a childish decision to try on a dress - that clearly was not right for her - in

  2. "Public men, Mr Birling, have their responsibilities as well as their privileges." Show how ...

    Below the upper class were the middle classes (doctors, merchants, shop workers and clerks), after that came the craftsmen and skilled workers. At the very bottom of the social ladder was the largest class of all - the ordinary workers and the poor; many lived below the poverty level.

  1. Closely examine the character of Mr Arthur Birling and his daughter Sheila Birling showing ...

    He fails to see that a stable world is built on social fairness, not money. Mr Birling detests socialists who advocate that people are responsible for each other and that everyone must be treated equally. He says, "A man has to mind his own business and look after himself and his own..."

  2. What is the moral message Priestly wants us to learn from the play an ...

    My moral for Mr. Birling is possibly the same for each character: Never judge a book by its cover. To begin with Mr. Birling is a relaxed family man, and a bit dominating. Then he is put under inspection and becomes very defensive and aggressive. And towards the end Mr.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work