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Analyse Act One Scene One Of ‘Much Ado About Nothing’Consider It’s Effectiveness As The Opening To The Play.

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Introduction

Analyse Act One Scene One Of 'Much Ado About Nothing' Consider It's Effectiveness As The Opening To The Play. William Shakespeare is considered the greatest writer in the English language, perhaps in any language. Although he lived more than 400 years ago, his plays are still performed and loved throughout the world in many languages. Shakespeare was born in 1564 in Stratford-on-Avon, England. Relatively little is known about his early life, though that is probably not surprising. Most of what is known comes from public records or can be surmised from what is known about the time and place that he lived. Shakespeare died in 1616 and was buried in the church in Stratford. He wrote more than 30 plays throughout his life, each covering a variety of subjects and genres be they tragedies, comedies or histories. His plays are mainly remembered for two things they are the beauty of the words he wrote and the excellence of his storytelling. Shakespeare's influence continues until this day. His plays are still staged all over the world, and they continue to influence playwrights, directors, theatre designers, and actors. Shakespeare wrote the play Much Ado About Nothing some where between 1596 and 1599. The play is set in the city of Messina. The main themes in the play are Love, Deception, Nothingness, Jealousy, Male Domination and Honour. ...read more.

Middle

This is a long scene so it needed to be fast paced. The audience takes in a lot in Act One Scene One, Beatrice and Benedick have locked horns, Claudio is a hero figure and has fallen in love with Hero - a heroine and Don Pedro is to woo Hero on his behalf. The language of the play is very sophisticated, but does change throughout the play. Don Pedro, Claudio and Benedick love to demonstrate their friendship through banter and teasing. Attack and Counter -Attack appears in Act One Scene One between Beatrice and Benedick, in their merry war. Most of what Beatrice and Benedick say is in prose- this shows that they both are particularly intelligent characters. When the two characters first meet in Act One Scene One there is a sense of aggressive mockery in their speech. Benedick - "God keep your ladyship still in that mind, so some gentlemen or other shall scape a predestine scratched face." Beatrice - "Scratching could not make it worse, and 'twere such a face as yours were." Yet beneath the intensive mockery there is a more complex relationship. The scene is not so much filled with action as constant wit and plays upon words - the audience is bombarded with this. An audience in these days would appreciate the language how it is, though an audience of modern times may not. ...read more.

Conclusion

Honour is very important to the males in Messina; Claudio's acquired "much honour" so other males may feel jealous or intimidated by this. Hero is a possession to Leonato so her disgrace of honour then becomes his. Benedick's comment about 'cuckolded' foreshadows Claudio's later jealousy. " Why I'faith, me thinks she's to low for a high praise, to brown for a fair praise and to little for a great praise. Only this commendation I can afford her, that were she other than she is, she were unhandsome, and being no other, but as she is - I do not like her." There is also jealousy between Don Pedro and Don John. Don John is evidently jealous of Don Pedro, he is seen as the valiant army leader, unlike Don John, and also Don Pedro is next inline for the throne in the city of Arragon. Because Don John is his bastard brother he isn't impressed that Don Pedro gets all of the attention. This scene sets up the basis for the rest of the play, its has set the main themes for the rest of the play. All the main characters have already been introduced and we have got an idea of what we think will become from the rest of the play, and what the characters will get up to. I feel this is quite an affective opening to Much Ado About Nothing, from the start it has an empowering affect upon the reader and indulges them to read more. Claire Barker 44305 7004 ...read more.

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