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Analyse and interpret Wordsworths poem I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud

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Introduction

"I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud" - analyse and interpret Wordsworth's poem "I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud" ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ The poem "I wandered lonely as a cloud" was written in 1804 by William Wordsworth, and is categorized as a representation of Romanticism. A typical Romantic poem often starts with a description of nature, and then slowly moves on to a human emotional problem, which is a result of the observation of nature.1 This statement matches Wordsworth's poem. The Romanticism was a period, where people had become fascinated by nature and the effect that nature has upon the state of mind. The Romantics viewed nature as a deity with which they could develop a relationship, and Wordsworth was a poet who inspired himself from nature, and his main theme of this poem was the human emotions inspired by nature. Wordsworth opens his poem "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" with him describing his action of walking in the landscape. ...read more.

Middle

This makes the reader visualize a field of thousands of daffodils that look like they go on forever, like stars on a cloudless evening. Through using the reader's imagination, Wordsworth is able to create beautiful images of nature. As he is describing the daffodils, Wordsworth helps us to visualize what he himself has seen and was so moved by; "Tossing their heads in sprightly dance - The waves beside them danced; but they - Outdid the sparkling waves in glee" 4. These daffodils, weaving beautiful with each other in the wind, have romantically touched Wordsworth. He uses the daffodils to show what nature can do on person's well being. "And then my heart with pleasure fills - And dances with the daffodils"5 proves that by seeing something so simple as a field of flowers makes a feeling of happiness overcome a person's heart. So, the daffodils become much more than just flowers. ...read more.

Conclusion

The poet is looking at the wonderful nature and is struggling to find inspiration. Wordsworth looks upon it with a "pensive mood"7 and becomes awfully upset and worried that he might not find revelations from the natural beauty in the world. The speaker in the poem is William Wordsworth himself, which is already emphasized in the first line; "I wandered lonely as a cloud..."8 The poem is written in past tense, as Wordsworth talks about something he has experienced on a certain day in his life. Wordsworth begins his narrative with a burden as he compares himself to a lonely cloud. He then discovers the beauty and the wonder of nature, in which he becomes happy. So he progresses from the mind set of detachment in a state of depression and loneliness he finds happiness ans joy in nature's landscape of the golden daffodils. 1 http://britishromanticism.wikispaces.com/Poetry 2 Line 9-12 in the poem 3 Line 12 in the poem 4 Line 12-14 in the poem 5 Line 23-24 in the poem 6 Line 13-15 7 Line 20 in the poem 8 Line 1 in the poem ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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