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Analyse chapter one of great expectations by Charles Dickens with detailed reference to text, show how dickens encourages us to feel sympathy for both Pip and the convict

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Introduction

Analyse chapter one of great expectations by Charles Dickens with detailed reference to text, show how dickens encourages us to feel sympathy for both Pip and the convict. Dickens in his time was a social revolutionary. He could see that people were treated badly and he wanted to help change it. During Dickens's life psychology had just become popular. Dickens was particularly interested in the theory that how a child is treated when they are young influences their behaviour when they grow up. Pip is the first character that we see in the novel. He is sitting alone in the graveyard looking at his deceased parents graves and thinking what they were like. "The shape of the letters on my fathers grave gave me an odd idea that he was a square, stout, dark man with curly black hair. This particular line shows that although Pip is in a dark graveyard at such a young age he still thinks quite a happy humorous thought. For a young boy his imagination is obviously quite advanced and vivid. Pip is quite obviously feels lonely and isolated. "I called myself pip and came to be called Pip." By using this phrase Dickens shows us the huge burden of responsibility that Pip has for his own life. The personal pronoun I is used by dickens to portray Pips loneliness and isolation. ...read more.

Middle

And you get me whittles he tilted ma again. You bring them both to me he tilted me again. Or I'll have your heart and liver out he tilted me again." Dickens makes the convict speak in short sharp orders to make sure that he understands him in his state of shock. Dickens also repeats one phrase to hammer a sense of danger into Pip and the readers by making him speak in imperative language. The first chapter is set in the "marsh country down by the river, within, as the river around 20 miles of sea." This first description makes the setting sound very nice but again first impressions are very false in this book as every other description of it makes it sound dark and evil. "The marshes were just a horizontal black line and the river was just another horizontal line not nearly so broad or so black, and the sky was just a row of angry red lines and dense black lines intermixed." Here Dickens uses pathetic fallacy so that the dark blurred surroundings could be compared to Pips Dark blurred thoughts about the convict. Also here the metaphors give the reader a cinematographic view of what Pip sees. The setting has objects and points which are very concentrated points of fear for Pip like "a jibbet with some chains hanging to it which had once held a pirate. ...read more.

Conclusion

"The small bundle of shivers growing afraid of it all and beginning to cry was Pip." I think that telling the story in the first person like this adds a sense of intimacy to the story. The story is a buildings roman about Pip but it also tries to underline some of the social problems that existed at the time "That he made it go head over heels in front of me and I saw the steeple under my feet." Here Dickens emphasizes how Pips life is turned upside down in a second. Life was like this for many other children of the time. I think that Dickens chose to write chapter one of the novel like he did to confuse the reader in a way that makes them want to read on to find out what happens so that they are no longer confused. Pip is introduced and is made out to be a poor boy with very little family and very lonely and isolated. The convict on the other hand is probably the most confusing character as Dickens contradicts the way in which we think of the convict in that he at first seems to be evil and nothing else but slowly Dickens tries to make the reader pity the convict and see his desperation. As the novel Is written in first person then I think it is fair to assume that Pip also feels some sympathy for the convict as it is his thoughts and memories that we are reading. ...read more.

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