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Analyse the different types of dramatic action in Act 1 Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet, and show how this scene links with other parts of the play. What contribution does the scene make to the play as a whole?

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Introduction

Analyse the different types of dramatic action in Act 1 Scene 5 of 'Romeo and Juliet', and show how this scene links with other parts of the play. What contribution does the scene make to the play as a whole? Romeo and Juliet, two lovers whose destinies are carved by the stars to meet and inevitably, fall in love, however, paired with that love also comes great misfortune. A story known by many worldwide and one of the biggest and most popular love stories known throughout the world; Romeo and Juliet is a tragic love story brought by none another than the poetic genius, William Shakespeare. When you hear 'Romeo', you can't help but think 'Juliet'. These two have been ingrained as the two lovers who were destined to be and die together and it all started from a play written by Shakespeare. Throughout all of Romeo and Juliet, Act 1; Scene 5 plays a huge role in the play, later on defining the play as a whole and everything that happens. It shows off the extravagant personality of the characters and the poetic language that Williams Shakespeare uses to represent his characters that not only were used by Romeo to catch Juliet's heart, but also to catch the reader's heart. This scene not only does that but it also initiates the start of one of the most popular relationships in literary history between Romeo and Juliet and thus, we see why this scene is so important to the play. The techniques used in this play were all linked together to create a wonderfully formed pace that drags the reader in and blend them into the fantastical feel of the love Romeo and Juliet had for each other, especially with the poetic language used between them that show us Shakespeare's skill to manipulate words to create such language that makes us immediately be charmed by the characters. ...read more.

Middle

With the vivid descriptions, we form an image of how Romeo sees Juliet and the beauty of her relayed into words. We immediately note down his view of Juliet with words such as 'snowy dove' or comparing her to be brighter than the sun itself. However, this is also a hint of tragedy as it refers to the stars which set a reminder of the ill fate of destiny. Romeo describes Juliet with words brought and compared to religion, alluding her to being able to provide a blessing to his unholy self. What we also see in this scene are the rhyming couplets in Romeo's poetic language, giving more depth to his character and the way he speaks so poetically, so desperately in love. We see his love in a more intense light. However, Tybalt brings a totally different atmosphere. He brings rage and anger and aggressiveness into the atmosphere. He ruins the cheerful atmosphere with his hate-filled speech and here, we also have another hint of danger. Tybalt, surely one with as much hatred as him to the Montagues would cause problems between Romeo and Juliet! His anger contrasts with the cheerful atmosphere set by the servants and the Capulet, and differs greatly and threatens the romantic atmosphere between Romeo and Juliet with the potential violence rising from him. The atmosphere of hatred and detest is immediately set with words such as 'scorn', 'spite', 'villain' and we go back to the foreboding of danger that is hinted deeply by his violent threats in the quote: "Patience perforce with wilful choler meeting, Makes my flesh tremble in their different greeting. I will withdraw: but this intrusion shall, Now seeming sweet convert to bitter Gall." The implication is set that, although he'll have to withdraw at this time, Romeo's intrusion to this party will soon be avenged by him from the quote 'Now seeming sweet convert to bitter Gall." ...read more.

Conclusion

As well as this, we also note that Romeo and Juliet have both realised that they've fallen madly in love with their greatest enemy. The stars, the love and the enemies; all these point to tragedy. But other than fate, destiny, stars and tragedy, we also have the theme of young love. Young love and first love and love at first sight. All these are part of the love between Romeo and Juliet and with all these deepening the feelings Romeo and Juliet have, it is also what creates such a strong relationship and poetic form between the two. Without their love being so pure and strong, there wouldn't be such poetry between the two. As we conclude, we've noted a large variety of dramatic action/techniques used to create an atmosphere, an effect and a pace, varying from strong imagery, personalities of characters affecting pace, oxymorons and poetic speech. These all affect the previously 3 mentioned. The atmosphere needs to be changed to relate the state of minds of the audience to the feelings going on in the play. The effect needs to occur to affect the minds of people and instil the cause. And finally, the pace needs to be changed to engage and create suspense for the audience. By the end of this scene, the audience is left to ponder about the forthcoming events. With all the premonitions with the stars, with the anger from Tybalt, with the threatening words, with the love being between two of the biggest enemies, we just know and sense the danger approaching. And in the end, we see that this scene was extremely well written. From the beautiful flowing words coming out of Romeo's mouth to Juliet's replies being just as graceful, we can easily see the poetic skills of Shakespeare. But we also note a lot of other things such as the comic pace created by the Nurse to Tybalt's anger portrayed through his hard words. The scene was excellent and the poetic form was amazing. ?? ?? ?? ?? Sadian Choudhury English 11T Ms. Hamid ...read more.

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