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Analyse the linguistic and structural methods by which Huxley conveys the beliefs, practises and social issues raised in Chapter Three of Brave New World. Consider how he uses a variety of characters to show the ranges of social conformity.

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Introduction

Analyse the linguistic and structural methods by which Huxley conveys the beliefs, practises and social issues raised in Chapter Three of Brave New World. Consider how he uses a variety of characters to show the ranges of social conformity. Linguistically, Huxley cleverly incorporates different techniques into his writing to successfully portray both the structured views of the society in Brave New World and also, the necessity to conform to this society. One technique Huxley uses to convey beliefs clearly, and the idea of conformity is repetition. In pages thirty-eight to forty-six, a conversation takes place between Fanny and Lenina with voices in the background as a voice of the conformed society. 'Ending is better than mending, ending is better than mending.' These hypnopaedic voices clearly show how Lenina feels drawn to thinking and what their society regards as correct. Fanny is also used as a voice for society in hers and Lenina's conversation, when Lenina begins to think individually and differently to her own views. This conversation, however, appears strange to us as readers as the beliefs of the people in Brave New World are the opposite of our own expected reactions. ...read more.

Middle

Her comments are both bitchy and stereotypical, yet Lenina appears unaffected, perhaps seeing past the idea of perfection and recognising other features; " 'He's so ugly! Said Fanny 'But I rather like his looks.' 'And then so small.' Fanny made a grimace; smallness was so typically low-caste.' Bernard is a very interesting and prominent character in Brave New World in that he experiences different emotions toward different events, unlike the other characters. He seems more intelligent than Lenina, and far more aware he is different. He appears angered towards other characters at times " 'Idiots, swine!' Bernard Marx was saying to himself, as he walked down the corridor to the lift.' Without characters such as Bernard and Lenina it would be difficult to observe how far society has conformed. Bernard is very much easier to identify with, as he experiences many of the emotions that resemble normality. The fact that he is, in many ways, a social outcast evokes sympathy from the audience. This is also the case with Lenina, when she and Fanny dispute, as Lenina's feelings seem very normal to the reader. Another linguistic technique Huxley has used is symatic fields, helping to convey different aspects of society, beliefs and practises. ...read more.

Conclusion

The fact these people and events of extreme significance are interrupted so often, by the indication of dusting, portrays how little they know. In addition, the way in which 'Ford' has replaced 'Lord' shows absence of religion. Huxley has cleverly chosen 'Ford' as the sounding is similar to 'Lord' ensuring the reader can make the connection between the two. Mainly concrete nouns are used in this chapter, making it seem very factual, again showing lack of emotion in their society. Abstract nouns are used in areas, usually to portray a negative image, however. 'Their smile was rather patronising. They had put aside similar childish amusements too recently to watch them without a touch of contempt.' Although this section of writing makes the students appear to have individual emotions, they are still all feeling the same. Emotion is described in one particular situation - "The Controller's evocation was so vivid that one of the boys, more sensitive than the rest, turned pale at the mere description and was on the point of being sick", yet this disgust is not something the audience can easily understand. Also, the next paragraph contrasts the former - "Lenina got out of the bath...' This makes the emotion seem unimportant, as they are in the society of Brave New World. ...read more.

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