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Analyse the ways that the director builds suspense and scares the audience in the film Jaws.

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Introduction

Analyse the ways that the director builds suspense and scares the audience in the film Jaws. Jaws is one of Steven Spielberg's historic films which no one will ever forget. Jaws is about a great white shark that leaves the audience horrified of the actions which take place on the small holiday resort of Amity Island. It takes place on 4th July, because this is a time when a lot of tourists would go to Amity Island to celebrate Independence Day. This adds to the suspense because it shows us all the potential victims of the shark. In the title sequence and throughout the play we sense that the shark is present. This is because the simple sound of 'dur dum' becomes synonymous with the shark; this adds great effect to the film. ...read more.

Middle

When the shark actually attacks it kills a young boy. There is a low angle which is when we see the shark's point of view. When the deadly predator attacks it moves on a track from person to person. This shows us all the sharks' potential victims, until it attacks the small innocent by. Steven Spielberg shows the audience varies pieces of evidence which shows the shark to be dangerous. It scares us through the books by showing us the size of the shark and how much damage it can do to someone. It also shows us the victims of the shark; an example of this is when we see an arm floating in the water or when we see the face of someone who has been attacked by the shark. ...read more.

Conclusion

see is them surrounded by water, so when we see them drunk we feel as if they cannot protect themselves and are defenceless. We also see the shark for the first time, so when we see how huge and strong it is again the three men seem weak. When Quint is killed by the shark we see the fish chew him slowly so when Brody is left to kill the shark alone, the audience feel as if he has no chance of surviving. I think that the scariest moment in the play was when one of the men are sent down into the water to kill the shark. This is because we see the strength of the shark. I think that Steven Spielberg has created an excellent film of 1975. ?? ?? ?? ?? Media Coursework: Jaws By Gurdip Kaur Bening 1 ...read more.

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