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Analyse The Writers Use Of Language In The Sonnets Studied And Comment On Any Comparisons And Contrasts Between The Poems

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Introduction

Analyse The Writers Use Of Language In The Sonnets Studied And Comment On Any Comparisons And Contrasts Between The Poems? After studying all the Sonnets I have realised that they all use interesting language and there are many comparisons and contrasts, which one can make between them. The three sonnets, which I have studied, are 'Let Me Not' and 'Shall I Compare Thee' both by William Shakespeare and Donne sonnet number 10. In the first quatrain of "Let Me Not" by Shakespeare uses formal language "marriage of true mindes". In fact this language is very similar to the wedding vows. It also suggests honesty and fidelity and they are joined together as in a marriage of love. "Let me not...admit impediments" Shakespeare is saying that true love has no obstructions, he then explains why. Love does not "alter when it alteration finds" means that it is not affected by change in one of the lovers, in the situation. Love does not bend "with the remover to remove" means that when one person ceases to love, the other does not. He uses repetition effectively; "'love is not love', 'alters...alteration', 'remover to remove'" this repetition links these phrases together which amplifies that these acts are not true love. ...read more.

Middle

Summer "hath all to short a date" it is fleeting and interrupted by other seasons. If we compare these points with the statement that love is not shaken by "tempests." In the previous sonnet, we see how Shakespeare uses images of nature through out the two poems. Nature, like love, is beautiful but also as nature can destroy, sometimes itself through storms, while love is unchanged over time. This links also to the first poem how love is unchanged or unmoveable. Summer varies in intensities "the eye of heaven" shines, too hot which is fierce and unpleasant. Or "often is his golden complexion dimmed" Shakespeare is personifying the sun here like in the first poem when Shakespeare personifies love. Shakespeare love is always pleasant, never less beautiful unlike the dimmed complexion of the sun. Shakespeare returns to the theme of death with "death not brag", like in the previous sonnet where he says, "times...bending sickle." Just as in the Let Me Not where age cannot affect love, in this one death cannot reach Shakespeare lover. Death cannot "brag thou wondr'st in his shade" Lovers "eternal summer shall not fade." ...read more.

Conclusion

He uses this question to be intimidating, not in the way that Shakespeare used his. In the final couplet he concludes what he has said, but unlike in the Shakespeare poems he is not proving his Sonnet. He works on the argument that at the end of time, which is also a subject in the second poem, we shall wake and live eternally and because of this Death will not be alive either. He uses a wonderful irony at the end where he says, "Death, thou shalt die." The most obvious comparison between this poem and the others apart from the fact that it is a sonnet is that it is about avoiding death. The two Shakespeare Sonnets both use the same rhyme scheme. They use the classic Shakespearian sonnet rhyme scheme. Donne's sonnet is different because he uses a mixture of the Shakespearian sonnet rhyme scheme and the Petrachan rhyme scheme. They all also use iambic pentameter, which helps the sonnet to flow and gives it structure. Finally I conclude that all three sonnets use language effectively and all use the sonnet structure to great advantage. The strict rules involved in writing sonnets show the great skill of both the writers as they choose this art form to express their opinions. Michael Gilson 11s 3 ...read more.

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