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"Analyses of how H. G. Wells uses the sensation of power to create a once sane scientist become engulfed by the power threat he feels when unseen, and how this power mongering eventually leads to his insanity."

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Introduction

"Analyses of how H. G. Wells uses the sensation of power to create a once sane scientist become engulfed by the power threat he feels when unseen, and how this power mongering eventually leads to his insanity." By Mark Buchanan 5ba Herbert George Wells was born in 1866 in Bromley, Kent. His career as an author was promoted by an unfortunate accident as a child. He broke his leg and spent the mandatory rest period reading every book he could find. Wells was awarded a scholarship and furthered his education bat the Normal School of Science in London. It was at the Normal School that Wells came under the wing of a famous biologist Thomas H. Huxley. Wells' "science fiction" (although he never called it such) was clearly influenced by his studies at the Normal School and his interest in biology. The story of the Invisible Man, which Wells wrote in 1896, begins with a mysterious man arriving at a rural English inn during a cold and stormy night. ...read more.

Middle

In a desperate race against time, the Doctor frantically seeks to reverse his discovery before mad delusions of his own greatness to be, already creeping into his mind, claims him completely. But madness overcomes him, his reign of terror begins, and the invisibility serum pulls its final punch in death. The notion of having the power to be unseen has always been attractive because of the escape from consequences it would offer. An invisible man could rule the world! The power that this implies is the temptation of invisibility; to get away with things that would be impossible to get away with in normal circumstances. On the other hand, for Dr. Griffin, invisibility becomes a curse rather than a blessing. He is trapped, with his sanity already fighting a losing battle. Not only has he lost his body but he stands to lose his mind as well. The prospect of losing your mind completely is more frightening than death. The power to become invisible has become the stuff of fantasy and comic books, as writers and artists have given it legendary status. ...read more.

Conclusion

By putting his characters in imaginary situations, Wells easily examines how they behave when pushed to the limits of experience. The Invisible Man finds himself with tremendous power to fight and flee, a power which he uses with great delight. As he is invisible, no one can catch him, so there is no moral restraint on his actions. H. G. Wells brings up many points that are important in a society. He discusses the moral problems of mankind and its reaction to the power science can bring. He criticizes man's hunger for power and science by showing what mayhem and destruction it can wreak. In the Epilogue he shows how man thinks of himself as moral but cannot make constructive use of the power at his hands. The person finally in possession of the Invisible Man's journals says, "I wouldn't do what he did; I'd just - well!" Wells is saying that we really do not know what to do with the power so we should not bother trying to gain it all. Mark Buchanan 5ba "An analysis of how H. G. Wells..." ...read more.

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