• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Analysis and comparison of two gothic short stories: The Monkey(TM)s Paw(TM) by W.W. Jacobs and The Red Room(TM) by H.G Wells

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Analysis and comparison of two gothic short stories: 'The Monkey's Paw' by W.W. Jacobs and 'The Red Room' by H.G Wells Both 'The Monkey's Paw' and 'The Red Room' were written around the turn of the century, 'The Monkey's Paw' being written in 1902 and 'The Red Room' being written in 1894. The genre was first introduced by Horace Walpole and his gothic novel 'The Castle of Otranto'. The gothic genre blended two already well established genres, horror and romance, because of this it soon became very popular amongst other writers and issued an almost cult-like following. Many writers began to emulate the genre in their own writing, for instance Mary Shelley wrote 'Frankenstein', which in many ways popularised the genre. It was at its peak in the times coming up to the turn of the century, with the likes of Bram Stoker writing 'Dracula', Robert Louis Stevenson's 'Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde' and the two short stories in question. The defining feature of the gothic genre is the necessity of tension. The creation of tension is achieved with the use of typical features, for instance setting or use of characters. ...read more.

Middle

Also the three part list emphasises the isolation and in that weather it would be near impossible to communicate with people outside your own home. The house itself is shown as a safe place. The main reason for this is the use of another typical feature, the fire, because the White family are all happy and surrounding the fire it creates a contrast with the weather outside and makes the house seem secure and sheltered to the reader. It is very common for a gothic story to be set in a secluded castle like in 'The Red Room'. This is because in a castle there are often many empty rooms that the custodian rarely goes in, anything could happen in that room. Also castles are often depicted as very cold and dark because they were lived in mainly in times where there was no central heating or electricity. 'The Red Room' also uses a fire as a main setting with all the characters congregated around it for warmth and protection. Along with setting the other main feature in the gothic genre is that of the characters which often are disfigured, for instance in 'The Red Room' H.G. ...read more.

Conclusion

Other than Sgt Major Morris who brings with his entrance a portent of doom, no characters in the monkey's paw are menacing. The writer uses pathetic fallacy with the arrival of Sgt major Morris because the bad weather is justified when he enters the house from the intimidation and menace he brings. The menace comes from the talisman, the monkey's paw, another typical feature. To conclude, in many ways both stories are similar for instance both include an isolated building as there setting and both focus on the fire and light being the main protection. However they do differ; in 'The Monkey's Paw' Jacobs uses the talisman and that of the unknown mysterious magic put on it, for instance "It had a spell put on it by an old Fakir." Shows that the monkeys paw had mystical, unknown magic put on it. Fakirs are often depicted to be associated with black magic so the reader already knows that if the magic worked it would not be good. The focus of 'The Red Room' is that the main character is afraid of fear itself "The worst of all the things that haunt poor mortal man" "in all its nakedness- Fear!" ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE H.G. Wells section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE H.G. Wells essays

  1. knowing and not knowing humour and iriony in H.G Wells' short stories

    In addition the Bacteriologist shouts out, when he realises the test tube is gone, "Blue ruin!" The reader naturally thinks he is cursing, but blue ruin is actually the name of the liquid. So again the Bacteriologist tricks us because he gives us a clue but we don't recognize it as one.

  2. Comparing "The Monkey's Paw" and "The Red Room" In this essay, I am going ...

    Moving on to discussing the structure of "The Monkey's Paw". We can clearly see that the writer has began his story with a very typical first sentence: "Without, the night was cold and wet," This sentence is very traditional and is typical for a scary story and is found in many scary stories beginnings.

  1. Free essay

    Comparing The Red Room (H.G Wells) and The Yellow Wallpaper (Charlotte Perkins)

    'Picked out everything in vivid black shadow and silvery illumination.' Everything is 'picked out' or highlighted and so it is noted. Black creates a sense hesitation and darkness so you cannot see the unknown. The silver comes from the moon and this creates a mysterious tone or the sense of the supernatural very strong.

  2. Free essay

    How is the convention of gothic fiction used to build tension in "The Red ...

    This seems to us supernatural, as candles cannot go out by themselves without being blown out. Therefore we may think that the candle must have been blown out by someone invisible, a ghost even. This creates tension to the reader as it is the first proof that the ghost could of actually been in the Red Room.

  1. Conventions of the Gothic Horror - The Red Room by H.G. Wells

    represented as the lights just lying in the abandoned room forgotten and discarded. Another convention would be the natural elements heightening the isolation: "The long, draughty subterranean passage was chilly and dusty, and my candle flared and made the shadows cower and quiver."

  2. Discuss the ways in which H.G Wells creates tension and drama in The Red ...

    builds up tension because we don't knows who this predecessor is and it is a newly found mystery to the story. He sees many things on his journey such as shadows, moonlight, darkness and horrible corridors and doors. The techniques are things such as repetition, personification and fear of something

  1. Compare how the authors of The red Room(TM) and The Signalman(TM) create a sense ...

    the signalman was suffering from 'disease of the delicate nerves that minister to the functions of the eye'. The charters in both stories are haunted by something or someone. Dickens describes the signalman in a way that you first think he is a ghostly figure due to the way his

  2. Knowing and not knowing, humour and irony in the short stories of H.G. Wells

    At the end when Clayton dies no one knows why, it could be because he was telling the truth this time, or he had too much to drink but all we know that he dies, therefore no one knows if he says telling the truth.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work