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Analysis of I Am, by John Clare

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Introduction

Analysis of I Am, by John Clare The poem 'I Am' by John Clare is written in the form ABABCC, except for the first verse, which is ABABAB and it is written in iambic pentameter. The structure of the three stanzas seems to be based on time, the first stanza is what is happening, he is 'live' the second is what is about to happen, what he is going 'into' and the third is what he thinks or wants to happen, what "I long for". There is a great use of punctuation, yet there are only two sentences, making the poem seem continuous, troubled and searching and without definite closure. The title of the poem is repeated four times in the first verse, but then it is not written again at all. ...read more.

Middle

But yet he does not seem happy, he is forgotten by his friends, uncared for, but still alive, and still willing to carry on for something. There seems to be something deeper that is lying under the surface that has not been explained yet, that he possibly doesn't want to discuss yet. In the second stanza, the imagery that started in the previous stanza is carried on. We move from " vapours tossed", to "living sea", and "shipwreck". These are all very forlorn and distressed images, which is the feeling of the poem. It is the "shipwreck of my life's esteems" that is the most interesting phrase in this stanza; it perfectly sums up the writers feelings towards himself, the complete absence of any self-value. ...read more.

Conclusion

He is in this limbo, this "nothingness" where he is without hope, love, self-esteem or joys, but it just alive. The last stanza seems at peace, it is full of longing and dreams. Anything can be possible in the future, it doesn't mater what you wish for. There is a want for something that is not an extreme, neither one nor the other, to be "Untroubling, and untroubled", "where woman never smiled or wept". This longing for something impossible in its simplicity is underlined by the want to sleep as a child and to abide with God, to just want grass below and sky above. Although the poem is extremely dejected, there is a sense of hope in it. Despite everything, there is always hope, a dream to wait for, weather it is God or a return to childhood. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

5 star(s)

This is a very concise and well written analysis that looks at the poet's use of language, structure and form. Relevant quotes from the text are used to support interesting interpretations.

5 Stars

Marked by teacher Laura Gater 04/07/2013

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