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Analysis of Inspection

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Introduction

INSPECTION ANALYSIS -Wilfred Owen Wilfred Owen was born on the 18th of March 1893 in United Kingdom. He is probably, one of the most important English War Poets. The popularity of Owen today can be explained by his condemnation of the horrors of war. As an English poet, he is noted for his anger at the cruelty and waste of war and his pity for its victims. He said, "My subject is War and the pity of War. The Poetry is in the pity." Being a soldier, he got killed in action on November 4th, 1918 in France, seven days before the end of the First World War. Owen's war poetry has blood as a recurring and ambiguous symbol of sacrifice: of the sacrifice demanded of and offered up by the fighting soldier. Blood, sacrifice, guilt are at the "heart of the poem "INSPECTION". The diction is largely colloquial and the tone is tinged with bitterness. ...read more.

Middle

A heavy beat at the start of line 1 promises drama to come. Then from line 5 the tension abates leading to a more reflective tone in the third stanza. The onomatopoeic effect in "rapped" and "snapped" add to the initial feeling of menace. Fairly constant rhyme and rhythm aid the poem's mostly conversational style. The MACBETH reference ("damned spot") in stanza 2 is charged with irony. In Lady Macbeth's case the blood is dirt, the dirt of guilt; in the soldier's case it clearly isn't, though the officer doesn't realise this and his naive remark prepares the way for his instruction to come. Stanza 3 reveals the soldier as the poem's truth-teller. He looks "far off' to where he was wounded," and is far-seeing too in being able to grasp what Owen later describes in STRANGE MEETING as "truths that lie too deep for taint". ...read more.

Conclusion

In INSPECTION Owen places himself at the centre of the action. He can be recognised as the officer in stanza 1, conscious of his rank and of the importance of maintaining discipline. We see him also in the second stanza, perhaps slightly unhappy on reflection about the man's punishment and seeking him out for a quiet chat, man to man. In stanza 3, the young who had been treated unfairly, complains against those who are in charge. It's a serious charge, because he's been harshly dealt with. However, if we assume that Owen himself is sharing the truth-teller's role, then Owen's angle will be a little different. For Owen, it is part of the system that is being called to give an account, a part of that world that needs to wash out its stains. INSPECTION leaves both private soldier and officer in rueful mood. It may have left its poet with more cause for ruefulness. By: Abdurrhman Ahmed Al-Shimi ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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