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Analysis of Nothing's Changed and Charlotte O'Neils song

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Introduction

I have been studying poems from different cultures. The two I have been studying are Nothing's Changed, by Tatamkhulu Afrika and Charlotte O'Neil's Song, written by Fiona Farrell. Nothing's Changed was written about District 6 in Cape Town which was really racist which is now not even though it still is racist. Charlotte O'Neil's Song was written about lower class people going to New Zealand to escape the racism in England. Nothing's Changed, talks about how racist Cape Town is after white people went to the town. In the first stanza, the writer shows that Cape Town doesn't have proper footpaths, 'Small round hard stones click under my heels,' This shows that District 6 is not a very nice place to be because it has stones instead of footpaths. The writer also shows that there is long grass on the footpaths, 'seeding grasses thrust bearded seeds into trouser cuffs,' This shows that the footpaths also are grassy as well as having stones on them. The writer also shows that the area is covered in rubbish and weeds, 'cans, trodden on, crunch in tall, purple-flowering, amiable weeds.' This shows that there is also rubbish and weeds on the path where the writer is walking. ...read more.

Middle

The writer also shows that the black people were meant to be rude all the time compared to a white person, 'spit a little on the floor: it's in the bone.' This shows that the white people think it's in the black people's genes to be rude. In the sixth and final stanza, the writer shows that he has got annoyed with the inn he decides to step back, ' I back from the glass, boy again,' this shows that he is getting angry with the inn. He also shows that he is angry with racism, 'leaving small mean O of small, mean mouth.' This shows that the writer doesn't want racism to exist in the world. He also shows that he wants to smash a window on the inn, 'Hands burn for a stone, a bomb, to shiver down the glass.' This shows he wants to get into the inn through the window hoping it would shatter the white only inn and racism. Charlotte O'Neil's Song was written on a passage from England to New Zealand for lower class people, and was written by Fiona Farrell. In the first stanza, she shows how she served as a servant, 'You rang your bell and I answered. ...read more.

Conclusion

The last line is different to the rest of the poem because I think it is the most important line which makes you think about the nineteenth century servants and how badly they were treated the line is 'and you can open your own front door.' This line sets the whole poem in a way which nothing else could because it makes you think. The similarities between the two poems are that they are both about discrimination, 'whites only inn.' From Nothing's Changed and 'The poor deserve the gate.' From Charlotte O'Neil's Song, but both these poems are about the writer's journey through the world involving racism and discrimination. The differences about the two poems are that they are written from different times, for example Nothing's Changed is from the twentieth century, where as Charlotte O'Neil's Song is from the nineteenth century. Also Nothing's Changed is about racial discrimination, where as Charlotte O'Neil's Song is about discrimination of class. Personally I prefer Nothing's Changed because it lets the people reading the poem know how much racism is still in the world because it is a more modern poem than Charlotte O'Neil's which is from a later date so it I less eye opening than Nothing's Changed. ?? ?? ?? ?? GCSE English Poems From Different Cultures Coursework - 1 - ...read more.

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