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Animal Farm: A Fairy story?

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Introduction

Animal Farm: A Fairy story? Orwell used the sub-title 'A Fairy Tale' initially as a satirical way of telling the reader the story does resemble real events in Russian history but that was not its only purpose. Animal Farm is a serious criticism of the USSR expressing his own concern about its failure, however Orwell subtitled and begins the novel with the disclaimer 'A Fairy Story'. This simple titling and sub titling of the book makes it appear to be a completely fictional work with animal characters which would appeal to the young rather than the older generations. This also seduces the reader into believing the text will be a light hearted entertaining read and disguises the strong underlying political message which the book is really about. ...read more.

Middle

He uses simple words and sentence structure to convey the story. This also provokes the reader into realising the truth behind the story rather than just perceiving it as a simple, child's tale. Animal Farm is set on a farm in the countryside. This type of setting is often used in a fairy tale. These are often perceived to be neat, tidy and quaint as well as the clich� of little hedgerows, brick barns with stacked hay piles along with a windmill dominating the view of the surrounding fields. A farmer and his wife would care for the farm. But it has to be said Manor Farm was not the conventional fairy tale farm, however the connection to a fantastical tale is there. ...read more.

Conclusion

Animal farm also provides the reader with this. It teaches, using animals, of mans greed and how this will ultimately lead to the collapse of a communist state as well as how the workers are taken advantage of. It also teaches of controversy and selfishness in a setting in which we thought to be secure. Orwell uses 'A Fairy Tale' to make people realise and take note of the moral implications addressed in the book. My personal opinion is that Orwell gave the novel the sub-title 'A Fairy Tale' to encourage the reader to look deeper into the narrative and not take it at face value. However, I don't think it can purely classified as a fairy tale as fits to many other genres. It could also be described as a fable, political analysis or an allegorical lesson for example. George Tuck 10C ...read more.

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