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Animal Farm is a classic guide for a dictator's rise to power

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Introduction

Nestor Chavez 1-23-05 IB English11 Ms. L� Word Count: Animal Farm: Take Home Essay Test Q: Animal Farm is a classic guide for a dictator's rise to power. What are the methods used by Napoleon and the pigs in their takeover of animal farm? Give an example of how a similar dictatorship has happened in history besides the Russian revolution. Animal Farm, by George Orwell, can be read on three different levels. On its first level, it is an entertaining story about farm animals and their cruel overseers. Very young children can understand and enjoy the story at this level. On its second level, it is an allegory representing the Communist takeover of Russia in 1917 and the subsequent perversion of the idealistic goals of the revolutionaries. On its third level, Animal Farm is an allegory representing any movement and the persons in that movement that goes crooked because of the corrupting lure of power. ...read more.

Middle

Saddam Hussein was especially known for not caring about age, but thinking more about his own safety. He encouraged younger boys to fight and know how to use weapons. Hirohito, the 124th Emperor of Japan, was even more careless about taking kids into training. He had young Unabomber's. He had his generals take care for most of the war dealings. They had Japanese families already thinking that having their children fight for them would bring honor to their families. Saddam Hussein also reportedly helped form secret police units that cracked down on dissidents and those opposed to Ba'ath rule. After Napoleon had established his secret police, the next step was to throw out any existent power or rivals. Snowball happened to be the pig in his way. He had his dogs chase him out of the farm and convinced the citizens of Animal Farm that he was a traitor. ...read more.

Conclusion

After everything was secured, there were many things to explain such as why it still wasn't like how the dictators promised it would be. Napoleon had Squealer throw out a whole bunch of numbers and statistics to make the animals believe that they were doing a whole lot better than when Mr. Jones was in charge. Fidel Castro and Saddam Hussein both also had a problem keeping his people off of poverty and hunger. Propaganda has also been a good way to keep the peoples minds off of their own problems. Napoleon would build up anger within the Animals, anger towards Snowball for sabotaging so many things when in reality it wasn't really him. Hitler and other dictators built up hate towards other countries using propaganda. In Iraq, there were a lot of traces of negative propaganda towards the United States. Hitler used propaganda to make his people believe that they were superior to everyone else. In text books they showed how they were the most evolved people because they resembled primates the least. ...read more.

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