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Another way of dramatic tension created by Priestley through the role of Eric Birling, where he explores rich people abuse poor people. The point is the audience may have lost interest in him

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Introduction

An Inspector Calls "An Inspector Calls" is a play written by John Priestley and it was written in 1945. It was set in 1912, just before World War 1 started. John Boynton Priestley was born in Bradford, Yorkshire on 13 September 1894. At the age of 16, Priestley decided to leave school rather than work towards a university scholarship. It was during the period before World War 1 that Priestley gained much of the experience which was to colour his writing career. J.B. Priestley wrote his first novel 'The Good Companions' and it was success, also he wrote his 2nd novel, 'Angel Pavement' and it was published in 1930. Over the next 7 years Priestley established himself as a leading figure in the London Theater which such play as 'Laburnum Grove' (1933). It was written in 1934 but like and An Inspector Calls, set in 1912. The play is set in Brumley, an industrial city in the north Midland's in the year 1912. In this essay I will talk about Inspector Goole a character in 'An Inspector Calls'. I will talk about how believable a policeman he is, how Priestly the author of the story uses the character and how the Inspectors treatments of the characters vary. First I will describe who the Inspector is, what sort of a character he is and will describe very briefly who the Birling family are including Gerald Croft. The plot of "An Inspector Calls" is about a police Inspector who interrupts an elegant engagement dinner party to question the family and their guests about an unsuspected suicide of a young working-class girl called Eva Smith. There are many plot twists and changes which work well with the characters portrayed in Priestley's play. The play is set in an upper-class household where class distinctions are breaking down, where privilege and responsibility are being challenged by a devious so-called Inspector Goole. ...read more.

Middle

Priestley created dramatic tension with a cliffhanger at the end of every Act. There is an example in Act 1 where Sheila says, Why - you fool - he knows. Of course he knows. And I hate to think how much he knows that we don't know yet". Sheila becomes a stronger character as the play moves on into Act 2. She disagrees with things people say, instead of merely going along with what others have to say. The Inspector shows a picture to Arthur Birling to show her identifies to make him accept he should also be blamed for her death; as he refused her a pay rise of only a few shillings in her wage. The Inspector showed that picture to the other Birling's as well but Arthur Birling didn't understand why he is being questioned he did accept that when Eva asked to him arise her wage he had discharged her and felt no sympathy for her. H e isn't ashamed of what he did as he is a businessman who cares about the profit and not the people who comes across this sort of stuff everyday. Sheila is the next one in the first to be interrogated , she complained to the manager at Milwards as she thought that Eva Smith was making fun of her while she tried on a new dress. As a result of this Eva Smith on as she called herself Daisy Renton, was killed out of her job. Sheila feels very ashamed about her behaviour and feels sympathy towards Eva Smith. She is open and, agrees about her involvement with the girls' death "But these girls aren't cheap labour....... They're people". Then afterwards she also stood up for Eva Smith's rights by making a good speech to her family. Sheila is completely opposite of her mother because her mother doesn't care about the lower class people. ...read more.

Conclusion

Eva/Daisy was at a time where she was most emotional and she must have been feeling desperate as her life had progressed in a downward spiral ever since she lost her job for fighting for what she believed in. When she presented her case to Mrs. Birling she did not expect a miracle but did hope for a little help. When Mrs. Birling refused her help, she must have felt like that was the last straw. She had missed the last train to any sort of life improvement and felt that she had no other option but to end her life. The most dramatic point in the play is when the Inspector says in his final speech 'we are responsible for each other.... if men will not learn that lesson, then they will be taught in fire and blood and anguish.' This is an implication that he is criticizing those who do not learn, not those who have acted that way in the past. We get the impression that she is a when Priestly adds, 'very pleased with life'. She is ignorant to the world of the working class, and is constantly surrounded by her riches without even considering the lives of other people. During the engagement party, Gerald gives Sheila an engagement ring. This is to represent their relationship and love. Her words on receiving the gift are 'Oh -Gerald-you've got it'. The pause in her sentence indicates the excitement in her voice. She then becomes very involved with the present- like a child receiving a birthday gift. Mr. Birling is about to make his speech about the war and the Titanic, however, he pauses when he realizes that Sheila may not be listening, as she is only concentrating on her ring. This is what a child may do when receiving a toy. This as with both her 'mummy' and her father gives us the impression that these people are annoying and makes us dislike them ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 RAJAN AJEETH 10 MCT ...read more.

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