• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Anylase two key speeches in Shakespeare's play Henry V.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Analyse two key speeches in Shakespeare's play Henry V. Pay particular attention to the persuasive devices being used. Analyse Kenneth Branagh's film version of Henry V and explore how he makes the speeches more effective. The play Henry V was written by William Shakespeare, and was designed to make it enjoyable to Elizabeth | who was the queen at the time. Queen Elizabeth | would enjoy a play with a victorious king and leader, so if the queen enjoyed it the rest of England would, so William Shakespeare would make a lot of money. The play would be performed in the Globe Theatre which was a very rowdy place. So Shakespeare made the speeches attention-grabbing and very effective to entertain people and to make people listen since it was a noisy place. Back then they would also 'boo' at the actors and throw food or other objects at them if they didn't like it. So Shakespeare tried to get the audience involved in his speeches. In the first speech the troops are invading the French town of Harfleur. Henry's troops are tired and weak and Henry wants them to have one more battle. ...read more.

Middle

Also by using the word 'you' it makes his men feel as if Henry is speaking to each one of them personally. In the second speech Henry and his troops have defeated Harfleur. King Henry tells the governor of the town to submit, because if he doesn't, King Henry's men will kill the residents. It also describes what will happen to them if they don't submit. King Henry tells him if he doesn't then it will be his fault that everyone will die he also tries to make the governor feel as if he has a choice, he is not forcing him into it. Rhetorical questions are used in the second speech; and example of this is "What say you?" Will you yield, and this avoid, Or guilty in defence, be thus destroy'd?" King Henry is asking the governor if he will give in. This is the ending of the speech and it is as powerful ending. By asking him rhetorical questions it makes the governor think what will happen if he doesn't give in and it helps him make his decision. Powerful statements are also used in the speech "Or, guilty in defence, be thus destroy'd?" ...read more.

Conclusion

In the film Kenneth Branagh often has Henry in the first speech making he sword punch the air, this adds enthusiasm to the first speech making things sound like fun and also makes him sound strong and ready to fight so his troops would carry on. Also the camera often looks down on his men to show Henry is important. Often at key points Henry's horse stands on its back two legs to make it look taller this makes Henry look even more important this is effective because the men would feel honoured as when Henry is flattering them and showing he believes in them as he is such a powerful man. In the first speech white lighting shines on Henry to show he is good and makes the audience see English as noble and the best. In the second speech a red light shines on Henry's face to show the danger that will happen to the town if the governor doesn't submit. This is effective because the audience sees this as being a threat and makes us want to listen and think about what will happen. Also the governor stays in the dark in the speech this shows that he is scared of Henry and worried about what will happen this is effective because it makes us believe England will win. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Writing to Inform, Explain and Describe section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Writing to Inform, Explain and Describe essays

  1. Macbeth - Shakespeare

    repetitive phrases such as, 'wouldst thou' in scene 7, line 41 and again in line 42. This is effective because it shows her point clearly making the reader believe she's right as she does to Macbeth later. She wants to teach Macbeth evil so he becomes like her as she

  2. Examine The 6 Chorus Speeches From Henry V And Discuss The Dramatic Purposes Which ...

    'Into a thousand parts divide on man,' 'O pardon, since a crooked figure may attest in little place a million,' this informs the audience to portray many men for every one actor. Also the speech explains that they have to imagine the stage is the huge fields of France: 'Can this cockpit hold the vasty fields of France?'

  1. Portrait of a King or Template for Kingship?

    The night before the battle of Agincourt Henry disguises himself amongst his men. His soliloquy before this shows how Henry understands that they are in danger, but is hopeful they can triumph over evil demonstrating his logical thinking and recognizing problems.

  2. How Shakespeare Prepares Readers For A Traguc Ending

    "is name is Romeo, and a Montague, the only son of your great enemy." This scene establishes the two forces of love and hate that eventually lead to the tragic ending of Romeo and Juliets' death. The love between Romeo and Juliet is vast but the force against them stemming from the rivalry between their families is unconquerable.

  1. The focus of the work is on the analysis of metaphors used in speeches ...

    The usage of imagery in political speeches reached its fullest flower in the 20th century. To many thoughtful observers the 1960 Kennedy-Nixon debates foreshadowed a new trend toward image- building rather than issue-resolving in American public life. Samuel Lubell, experienced public opinion analyst, wrote in 1962:"Right now the leaders in

  2. Green River Drama Play

    MORELLI (Angry) What the fuck has that got to do with anything? SCHMIDT Does your daughter have any enemies? (beat) SCHMIDT (Cont.) Do you? Doesn't your home have an alarm? Does the child have a life insurance policy? All the color drains from MORELLI'S face as we pull in close on him.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work