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Appreciation of Hardy's "Drummer Hodge".

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Introduction

Tosin Abdullai Appreciation of Hardy's "Drummer Hodge". Thomas Hardy's "Drummer Hodge' is a poem that laments on the horrors of war. It particularly focuses on the personal tragedy of a young innocent boy from Hardy's Wessex. This is however effective due to the fact that it makes the character win over more sympathy from us readers as we are able to acknowledge to a greater extent, the tragedy of this individual. The first verse tells us that the "Drummer Hodge" was thrown into a grave uncoffined which shows the lack of acknowledgement for his life and character. This portrays a feeling of sadness. ...read more.

Middle

The strangeness of this foreign land in made evident by "each night" that falls above his grave The second verse also lays emphasis on the contrast between the place where Hodge finds himself; in a foreign country and where he would have preferred to be buried. Unlike the first verse, it is further developed; giving a detailed explanation about the features of this foreign land (which I found out to be a region in the Southern part of Africa). This is done by a skillful construction of sentence by Hardy. 'From his Wessex home-The meaning of the broad Karoo, The Bush, the dusty loam...' ...read more.

Conclusion

"Yet the portion of that unknown plain will Hodge for ever be". The use of explosives in the words breast and brain suggest a tone of anger in what has become of this character, as his remains will now become part of "some southern tree'. The use of the alliteration in the "s" sound also suggests the insignificance of this foreign land to the poet. Another notable feature in this final verse is the use of "southern" and "northern" which provides a form of contrast between his lost homely life and where he finds himself resting. The downfall of Hodge's fate is made more striking by the restrained manner in which Hardy relates his burial. The young man's innocence and youth make his premature death seem all the more wasteful. ...read more.

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