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Are Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes Stories typical of detective fiction?

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Introduction

Are Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes Stories typical of detective fiction? Arthur Conan Doyle was born in 1859, in the city of Edinburgh Scotland. He was born into a poor family and was one of his parents ten children. After school Doyle stayed in Edinburgh to study medicine. Here is where many say Doyle's stories began. While studying medicine, Doyle worked under Dr Joseph Bell. Doyle became fascinated by Bells ability to make deductions about the history of his patients, based on the powers of observation. Bell became the eventual model for Sherlock Holmes. Doyle's first Holmes story 'A study in scarlet' was published in 1887. This story was a big success with the upper/middle class, whom the books were aimed at. Following the success of his first short story Doyle continued to write more of Holmes adventures. Doyle however became worried that he would only recognised for his Holmes novels, when he would rather be recognised in the fields of 'real literature.' In December 1893 Holmes, met his death at the hands of Professor Moriarty, his 'arch enemy' this was not to be the end of Holmes as there was huge public pressure on Doyle to write more stories. ...read more.

Middle

Many feel that Holmes has no flaws at all. Yet Holmes shocks the reader with having an addiction to opium. This flaw actually comes in handy when a potential suspect he is following has been regularly visiting an opium den. Holmes can use his addiction to opium as an excuse to pursue his suspect. It is in fact Watson who finds Holmes there as the story starts with a twist, as Watson is in fact looking for another friend who was last seen in the opium den. The characters in Sherlock Holmes novels are based mainly around Holmes himself. Watson is Holmes friends and loyal right hand man in many of his adventures. Watson is the friendly one of the duo; he is always left, like the readers, pondering Holmes assumptions. Watson is like a trusty hound and will follow Holmes into the greatest of perils. Which in turn enforces his friendship with Holmes. When Watson is not with Holmes he is at home with his wife. Being a doctor many people will come to Watson's home to seek advice/help, this indeed is how 'the man with a twisted lip' begins with a wife turning up at Watson's front door at 11o'clock ...read more.

Conclusion

Christie's novels like Doyle's follow Monsignor Ronald Knox ten rules i.e., no sinister or nasty foreigners are involved in the crime/mystery, although I have only read one of her crime novels. I feel her novels lack the enthusiasm that Doyle puts into his novels. Holmes has a far more superior attitude to him, than the lead character in Christie's novel. He is given respect from everyone who knows him, apart from his archenemy. Whereas, Christies main character is pushed around by his father and his not the top of his 'league' unlike Holmes. Overall I feel although Christie's novel was good the Holmes novels were far superior Out of the several Holmes novels I have read Holmes has always been acquainted with clients. The client will tell of his or her ordeal and then they will leave, Holmes and Watson will have a conversation before they go of to solve the mystery/crime that the client is apparently mystified by. Centuries after being written these books are still widely read and are popular with all ages. The books have a satisfying end and can be read over and over again and still they satisfy. Not only do they give the reader an insight into the life of Sherlock Holmes but it also gives us an idea of what Victorian England was like. ...read more.

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