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Arthur Conan Doyle - The Hound of The Baskervilles

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Introduction

The Hound of the Baskervilles - GCSE Coursework Essay In this essay I aim to look at how the settings in Arthur Conan Doyle's novel The Hound of The Baskervilles affect the atmosphere of the book. I will discuss a number of areas of the novel among these how the main settings of the novel compare and contrast with each other, The history, description and pre-knowledge of the main settings, The characters reactions to their surroundings and whether this give us any clues to the mystery and the minor settings that contribute to the atmosphere. Holmes' London flat is like the essence of a Victorian gentleman's club, warm, with a fire and a comfortable reading chair on the hearth rug it seems to be a very well appointed flat. We are not given any details of the apartment directly in the novel but we catch glimpses of it in the descriptions of Holmes or Watson's actions. "Through the haze I had a vague vision of Holmes in his dressing gown coiled up in his armchair". ...read more.

Middle

Baskerville Hall is a very feudal kind of name it conjures up an image of a giant rambling place in the middle of the country full of people in pink coats hunting foxes; this image is pretty similar to Sir Conan Doyle's description of the place. A sense of foreboding is added to people's feelings about the hall when the story of evil Lord Hugo is told "Hugo...was a most wild, profane and godless man" this adds atmosphere to the description of the Hall every shadow in the corner and every flickering of a lamp begins to seem dark and meaningful. The moor in The Hound of the Baskervilles is very much where we get our stereotypical image of country moors from, along with a whole raft of classic 18th and 19th century novels set on moors. It is the classic moor, windswept and desolate the moor appears dangerous even without the added terror of the Hound and its brutal killings. To help emphasize this danger the writer writes about the horrible howling of the hound almost every time one of the characters is on the moor, because of this image of ...read more.

Conclusion

Merripit House as the setting for the final scene of the mystery and a lot of the meetings with Stapleton plays a crucial role as the clich�d evildoer's lair. It is especially crucial to the plot as the place where Holmes, Watson and Sir Henry ambush Stapleton to finally capture him and with the fog swirling around it in the night it perfects a very dramatic ending to a suspense-filled novel. Stereotypical The places this novel is set in complement and complete the writing and I think that, in a different setting, not only would it be a completely different novel but it would also be a worse one because the setting adds crucial background to the story and without a setting of such depth of character the story would certainly be altered to its detriment. The moor especially is crucial to the mix of mystery and terror the writer has created. The settings contribute greatly in terms of language, mystery and atmospheric details to the novel and without them this book would not be the great literary classic it is. Tom Sissons 10J - Coursework Essay ...read more.

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