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As Hamlet thinks about the afterlife, he grows less and less confident in the idea of suicide. This again supports the idea of the uncertainty of death.

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Introduction

The Uncertainty of Death In Shakespeare?s play, Hamlet, the lead character, Hamlet, discovers that his father was murdered by his uncle, Claudius. In his plot to avenge his father?s murder, Hamlet pretends to go insane in attempt to get the truth out of Claudius; however, it appears that Hamlet may actually be going mad when he begins to contemplate the ideas of suicide in the third act of the play. Within his soliloquy, Hamlet portrays an overarching theme of the uncertainty and mystery of death. This theme is emphasized by the compare and contrast structure of the soliloquy, the repetition of the terms ?die? and ?sleep,? and Hamlet?s questioning and hesitant tone towards death. Hamlet?s soliloquy, in the third act of the play, demonstrates the theme of the uncertainty and mystery of death. One strategy that Shakespeare utilizes to define the theme is the way the soliloquy is structured. ...read more.

Middle

This structure compares and contrasts the pros and cons of suicide. The pros are summed up as an escape from life?s hardships, while the cons are the unknown aspects of the afterlife. This confusion within Hamlet raises a question about whether suicide is the answer. As Hamlet questions his perception of suicide, it raises the idea of uncertainty towards death. One truly does not know what the afterlife would bring. Therefore the shifts throughout the soliloquy aide in building up the theme. Another aspect that supports the theme of the uncertainty of death is Hamlet?s repetition of the terms ?to die? and ?sleep.? While Hamlet is describing that death would bring peace, he makes the comparison between death and sleep. Therefore, this indicates that committing suicide would bring peace. Each time Hamlet repeats these words builds support for Hamlet?s claim. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is clear through Hamlet?s diction, in which he appears to be pondering different ideas concerning what happens after death. He describes the afterlife as an ?undiscovered country.? He also indicates that it is the lack of knowledge about the afterlife that puzzles individuals when questioning suicide because it makes ?cowards of us all/ And thus the native hue of resolution/ Is sicklied o?er with the pale cast of thought.? This shows hesitance on Hamlet?s behalf, as he hints at the idea that the unknown brings fear to many. He also has a hesitant tone because he suggests that people must clearly think about the decision of suicide. He states that when facing suicide, there must be time in which the action of suicide, ?Must give us [Individuals considering suicide] pause.? As Hamlet thinks about the afterlife, he grows less and less confident in the idea of suicide. This again supports the idea of the uncertainty of death. ...read more.

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