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Assess the importance of 'The Garden Scene' to the development of Twelfth Night. How successfully have you seen this translated into the production?

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Introduction

Shakespeare Assignment Tim Carrol's - 2002 production at the Globe Theatre And Shakespeare's 'Twelfth Night' Assess the importance of 'The Garden Scene' to the development of Twelfth Night. How successfully have you seen this translated into the production? The Garden Scene is one of the most important scenes in the development of Shakespeare's 'Twelfth Night', whenever the play is presented, but different directors may choose to portray the scene in different ways. The scene does not directly affect the main plot of the play, but is very significant in the primary sub-plot. Malvolio, the conceited steward of Olivia, is conned by Olivia's uncle, Sir Toby Belch and Maria, Olivia's lady in waiting. A letter is written by Maria and left for Malvolio to find, suggesting that Olivia loves him. In this scene, Malvolio finds and reads the letter, secretly observed by Sir Toby Belch, Sir Andrew Aguecheek, and Fabian. This scene could be regarded as one of the most comic scenes of the play; the audience is shown Malvolio overcome with happiness at the idea of Olivia's love, and the other characters views of his reaction. ...read more.

Middle

Fabian is a minor character in the play, but in the scene, he shows his intelligence, his character, his sense of humour, and his friendship with Sir Toby and Sir Andrew. This is essential for the later scene in the play, in which Fabian and Sir Toby are attempting to start a fight between Viola (disguised as Cesario) and Sir Andrew Aguecheek. The garden scene fits in well with one of the major themes of the play. Viola loves Orsino, Orsino loves Olivia, and Olivia loves Viola (who she thinks is Cesario.) Malvolio's love for Olivia is yet another impossible and unfulfilled love. The scene is also influential in developing the mood and atmosphere. Act 2 scene 4, which immediately precedes this scene, is set at the court of Orsino. Orsino is explaining his love of Olivia, to Viola, who he also believes is Cesario. However, it is clear that he is attracted to Viola, but cannot understand this, as he believes Viola is a male. Although this scene is amusing, it does not provoke the sense of comedy and anticipation apparent is scene 5. ...read more.

Conclusion

He was the 'controller of her majesty's household', one of Elizabeth I's most superior servants. Being such a well-known figure made Knollys an easy target for satire, and much of the Shakespearian audiences would have recognised the parody. A significant omission from this scene is Feste, a jester who to both Olivia and Orsino. In Act2 Scene3, when the plan is first formulated. Maria tells Sir Toby and Sir Andrew that they will both watch Malvolio find the letter 'and the fool will make a third.' However, Feste is not present, and Fabian has taken his place. There is no reason given for Feste's absence, but I feel that his presence may have actually made the scene less amusing. His amusing and wry comments may have overpowered the observations of Sir Andrew and Sir Toby, and he would have become a very influential character in this scene, which I assume Shakespeare was trying to avoid. This part of the plot remains primarily based around Maria and the two knights. I feel that this scene is very influential in the development of the play, and this was shown very well in the Globe Production. Pritters Free GCSE coursework Page 1 of 3 ...read more.

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