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At the beginning of "Romeo and Juliet", Romeo is a love-sick boy, but by end, he is a man. Romeo's language and actions emphasize his attitude and behaviour throughout the play.

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Introduction

English Coursework- "Romeo & Juliet" At the beginning of "Romeo and Juliet", Romeo is a love-sick boy, but by end, he is a man. Romeo's language and actions emphasize his attitude and behaviour throughout the play. At the start of the play, Act 1 Scene 1, Romeo is a love-sick boy. He talks of his love for Rosaline constantly. "Alas that Love, whose view is muffled still, Should, without eyes, see pathways to his will!" His language is very poetical and over-charged, and Shakespeare uses sonnets in this part of the play, which portrays Romeo's attitude. He is in a depressed state of mind, caused by his love for Rosaline. He over-exaggerates everything he says, and creates a drama. "Tut, I have lost myself, I am not here, This is not Romeo, he's some other where." At this point in the play, Romeo is melancholy due to his unrequited love. This is completely changing his behaviour and makes him seem petty and immature. Other characters in the play comment on Romeo's behaviour during Act 1 Scene 1. Benvolio queries his sadness, "It was. What sadness lengthens Romeo's hours?" and advises Romeo to forget about Rosaline and look at other girls. ...read more.

Middle

After receiving Juliet's agreement for marriage, Romeo immediately begins to plan and arrange the ceremony. He turns to Friar Lawrence for help. "When and where and how We met, we wooed, and made exchange of vow, That thou consent to marry us today." He is very eager to marry Juliet and wants the marriage to be as soon as possible. This shows that he is very impatient, so once again, he is showing his childish tendencies. Friar Lawrence tells Romeo that his love for Rosaline was like a recitation memorised from a book, without true understanding, and chides him for his fickleness in love. "Holy Saint Francis, what a change is here! Is Rosaline, that thou didst love so dear, So soon forsaken?" Romeo is offended and denies it. "Thou chid'st me oft for loving Rosaline?" He reacts badly and tells the Friar that he is truly in love. "I pray thee chide me not. Her I love now." This clearly highlights Romeo's fickleness as he is appearing to know everything, being a teenager telling an adult that he is in love. In Verona, Act 3 Scene 1, a fight breaks out between the Montague's and the Capulet's when Tybalt arrives, seeking Romeo. Tybalt challenges Romeo to a fight and Romeo refuses. ...read more.

Conclusion

[Dies.]" Romeo, regretting what he has done, grant Paris' dying wish, and lays his body beside Juliet's. This a very mature response to what he has done. He clearly has respect for Paris after killing him, which is a responsible action. Romeo is again showing maturity. Romeo takes the poison as he cannot bear life without Juliet, and wishes to join her in death. "Here's to my love! [Drinks.] O true apothecary! Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die. [Dies.]" Here, the audience's first thought would be that he is a foolish child, committing suicide in distress, without thinking things through. But the audience can also see Romeo as a courageous man, giving up his life for his one true love. After examining all of the evidence, it is difficult to tell whether Romeo is a man or a love-sick boy. Shakespeare clearly exaggerates Romeo's actions and behaviour. Throughout the play, from beginning to end, it appears that Romeo develops from being a foolish young boy with love on his mind, to become a brave, mature man, taking responsibility for his actions. Romeo's love-sick behaviour is essential to the play. The two star-crossed lovers, battling for their love till death, creates the tragedy to such an extreme. The intense romance between Romeo and Juliet attracts a varied audience, and is the key to "Romeo and Juliet's" success. ...read more.

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