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At the beginning of the play, Macbeth is described by king Duncan as

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Introduction

At the beginning of the play, Macbeth is described by king Duncan as "noble" and at the end by the new king, Malcolm as "this dead butcher", justify these two very different descriptions of Macbeth and show how the changes in him lead to his final judgement of Malcolm. Macbeth is introduced in the play as "noble" and faithful to king Duncan, until he meets the "weird sisters" or "witches" who catch on to the little bit of ambition and jealousy inside him. They tell him he will become the "Thane of Cawdor," which quickly becomes true, and he will become the "king of Scotland". When the first of the two predictions comes true, Macbeth's ambition grows. Then King Duncan announces that his son Malcolm " shall succeed to the throne", and Macbeth is appalled, and his thoughts become ominous. When his wife Lady Macbeth hears about "the weird sisters" she too helps the ambition grow and puts evil plans and ideas in his head because she wants to become a Queen. ...read more.

Middle

She says if she had made a promise to kill her baby she would. "How tender t' is to love the babe that milks me: I would, while it was smiling in my face, have plucked my nipple from his boneless gums, and dashed the brains out, had I so sworn, as you have done to this" Lady Macbeth makes a plan for Macbeth to kill Duncan. She urges Macbeth to hide his deadly intentions behind welcoming looks " look like the time, bear welcome in your eye." She tells him to look innocent and leave it to her, "only look up, clear to alter favour ever is to fear. Leave all the rest to me". Macbeth struggles with his conscience. He has no reason to kill Duncan, and can't do it by him self " this Duncan hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been so clear in his great office, that his virtues, will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued against the deep damnation of his taking off." ...read more.

Conclusion

As an act of revenge on Macduff for his treachery he kills his family, "And even now to crown my thoughts with acts, be it thought and done." Macbeth, unstable, proceeds to place spies in every nobleman's house in Scotland, to keep his mind at ease. Scotland has been turned upside down, his own soldiers have left him and are fighting on the other side and those that do fight for him do so out of fear. Macbeth knows the battle will make or brake him, if he wins Scotland will stay a shambles if not Malcolm will rule Scotland. Macduff and Malcolm do not trust anyone not even each other, "I speak in absolute fear of you" Malcolm and Macduff test each other to see if they are spies, they then join forces "now we'll together." After the battle in which Macbeth died a fighting man Macduff displayed Macbeth's severed head. He has been disposed of like the traitor MacDonald at the beginning and now to Malcolm is no more a "dead butcher." ...read more.

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