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At the end of the play, Malcolm refers to: “This dead butcher and his fiend like queen.” Does this seem to you to be an adequate description of Macbeth and his wife?

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Introduction

At the end of the play, Malcolm refers to: "This dead butcher and his fiend like queen." Does this seem to you to be an adequate description of Macbeth and his wife? This quote has two sides to it. It can be applied to Macbeth and Lady Macbeth but it also ain't true. There are many incidents, which has made people think they are the description of what the quote has said. A butcher can be defined as someone who kills living things. It can also mean people are killed needlessly or violently. The word 'butcher' used in this way does describe Macbeth in some ways. During the play, Macbeth is involved in the murder of many people such as King Duncan, Banquo, and Macduff's wife and children. A fiend can be described as a very wicked or cruel person, a devil, a Satan or someone who causes mischief and annoyance. This can be applied to Lady Macbeth, who had only her own intentions at heart. For example, killing Duncan, the way she wanted all her womanise and conscience to go away. In the beginning of the play, Macbeth can be described as being loyal, courageous and noble. He was liked, trusted and respected by everyone around him. He was a real man. ...read more.

Middle

Banquo has been a true and honest friend to Macbeth. They have been through the good and bad times together. However, Macbeth thought it was necessary to have Banquo killed. Another example of Macbeth being like a butcher is when he hires the murderers to kill Macduff's family. Once again, they have done nothing wrong, but he kills them in order to hurt Macduff. This is a disgraceful act, to kill the innocent children and their mother. We have sympathy on the children and their mother. But by this time Macbeth is so full of power, ambition and assurance, he will do anything to get what he wants. Although Macbeth is a butcher many times throughout the play, he can be considered as a tragic hero. This is because he was a potentially a great man. He was too ambitious and went to get these ambitions but in the wrong way. If his qualities had been put to good use instead of evil, he would have been not only a great man but also a great King. Lady Macbeth could also be described as a tragic hero, as although she was fiendish, she did feel guilty at the end of the play for what she had done. Lady Macbeth had committed suicide in the play. ...read more.

Conclusion

Lady Macbeth once again shows her fiendish ways when she pretends to faint after hearing about the murder of the King and the murderers. She knows that King Duncan and the servants have been murdered but she still fools the people around her to believe that she is so sad about what has happened. The irony of this is that the night before she was not concerned at all, but is now acting as though it is tragic. Lady Macbeth continued to act like this until she fails to stop Macbeth from killing Banquo. She suspects that Macbeth will kill him, but does not convince him to. When Macbeth suggests that he is going to do something about Banquo, she makes no effort to dissuade him. She seems quite pleased that Macbeth is going to do something about Banquo, as it will help her remain Queen, safely. At this scene, Lady Macbeth still did not feel guilt for what they have done, and seemed to think that it was great that Macbeth was finally taking charge of his own deeds. Throughout the play Macbeth, Macbeth can be described as a Butcher, and Lady Macbeth can be described as a fiend-like queen. Many examples can be found throughout the play but when they die, I did feel a slight sympathy for them, even though they had caused their own fate. ...read more.

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