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At the start of the novel, Mr. Darcy says that Elizabeth Bennet is "Tolerable but not hansome enough to tempt me - By the end of the novel they are happily married - How does Jane Austin make this marriage not credible but desirable?

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Introduction

Sarah Hurworth 11H At the start of the novel, Mr. Darcy says that Elizabeth Bennet is "Tolerable but not hansom enough to tempt me2.By the end of the novel they are happily married. How does Jane Austin make this marriage not credible but desirable? Through out Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen comments that marriage in her time is a financial contract, where love is strictly a matter of chance. This is clearly evident from the very first line of the novel: "It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife" Lady Catherine states the fact that happiness in marriage is strictly a matter of chance. " This holds true in the conception of marriage held in the novel. All of the marriages in the book formed under the bonds of money, rather than the bonds of love. Elizabeth Bennet and Mr Darcy are the two key characters in Pride and Prejudice. Mr Darcy is presented as proud and Elizabeth is presented as prejudiced by Austen. This is not strictly true though, because Elizabeth is proud of herself and is also prejudiced but does not realise she is prejudiced until later on in the novel. Mr Darcy is prejudiced against those of a lower rank than himself, which increases his pride. In the novel Darcy and Elizabeth have to overcome several obstacles and their own faults before they can marry and discover what they really want. Darcy first displays his pride when Austen introduces him at the Meryton Assembly when he says, "There is not another woman in the room, whom it would not be a punishment for me to stand up with". ...read more.

Middle

In the letter Darcy tells Elizabeth what really happened between himself and Wickham and his reasons for separating Jane and Bingley. After reading Darcy's account of his dealings with Wickham Elizabeth does not know how to react. She begins to realise she judged Darcy wrongly and that she has been "blind, partial, prejudiced, absurd". She realises that her vanity has been the cause of her prejudice. Rereading the part of the letter that dealt with her sister she now sees that he had reason to be suspicious of Jane's attachment. Elizabeth also admits that Darcy's criticisms of the impropriety of her mother and younger sisters is just, and is ashamed and depressed.this makes Elizabeth realize that she has behaved very rudely towards Darcy for no good reason. Austen makes it clear that pride and prejudice are not really two separate problems in the novel, but that they are intimately connected. It is Elizabeth's pride that leads to her prejudice. Another incident which brings them together is when Elizabeth meets Darcy by accident when she is viewing his estate. She is surprised by his civility and kind enquiries about her family, he is more gentlemanlike and civil since the proposal. Her regard for Darcy seems to be increasing daily, though she is not quite aware of it. Her extreme nervousness and desire to make a good impression when Miss Darcy comes to visit shows that she now wants to impress and please Mr. Darcy. Having returned home from Derbyshire Elizabeth has to cope with Lydia's elopement with Wickham and tries to comfort her family. ...read more.

Conclusion

") retains his composure and displays his good-breeding in leaving. " 'Forgive me for having taken up so much of your time and accept my best wishes for your health and happiness.' Darcy's proposal presents the reader with an entirely different scene. It is at this point in the novel where emotions can be seen to be running high and thoughts being expressed on a very high emotional level suggesting that the two characters involved, Darcy and Elizabeth are on the same level. It is Darcy who leaves Elizabeth in a state of shock after he walks out in a hasty but polite manner to reflect on the things that were said and the occurrences of the day. Elizabeth drained after having very clearly stated her feelings of "utmost dislike" for Darcy who is left in the lone in a weak state of mind, "The tumult of her mind was now painfully great. She knew not how to support herself and from actual weakness sat down and cried for half an hour." This is the first point in the novel at which Elizabeth is shown to experience some sort of an emotional breakdown and therefore this makes it possible to see that Darcy's proposal has made a great impact on her. I think Darcy and Elizabeth suite each other extremely well, they both have the same tastes and interests. Elizabeth is different to the type of people darcy is used to, she is no afraid to speak her mind and criticize Darcy in any way. This is good for Darcy because it will make him realize how he offends other people with his proud manner when it is interpreted as him acting arrogant. ...read more.

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