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Austen presents us with several different examples of marriage in "Pride and Prejudice".

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Introduction

Austen presents us with several different examples of marriage in "Pride and Prejudice". Focusing on at least three couples, explore how each relationship is presented and what you think are Austen's intentions. In Pride and Prejudice Austen uses her own life as a basis of the story. She uses the social status and the rights of women in the 1700's. In the book Austen shows how women were expected to marry in the 1700's and it didn't matter whether they were a good love match, it just depended on the social status of the man. Austen had a mixed-up life and this may have affected the book as her view of marriage is seen through the eyes of Elizabeth Bennet. During Austen's life she was proposed to by Mr. Harris Bigg-White, like Elizabeth -when she was proposed to by Mr. Collins- she rejected him as she felt that he wasn't a good love match. In "Pride and Prejudice" Austen uses an omnipresent narrator (herself). This means that Austen can see any or all of the characters at anytime. The narrator is not through a character like in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird". Her omnipresent narrator subtly reveals her views on marriage by showing that the narrator agrees with Elizabeth's outlook on the different marriages that take place throughout the book. ...read more.

Middle

Collins is sagacious rather than emotional as she sees security and a stable future inside Mr. Collins. When Charlotte marries Mr. Collins, Elizabeth is shocked and feels that Charlotte's decision has affected their future forever. Elizabeth and Austen can see that they have both married for the wrong reasons, Charlotte for financial security and Mr. Collins for the chance to please his patroness Lady. Catherine De Bourgh. The marriage is wrong as they don't love each other. Austen presents Mr. Collins as fickle and unpleasant by showing that he disgraces the Bennet family by not being able to dance and by bragging about his wealth and his patroness, Lady Catherine De Bourgh and her wealth in turn. Austen has in mind a 'heroine' which is Elizabeth Bennet. Before she can fully play this role she has to go through a series of events. These involve Mr. Collins and Mr. Darcy proposing to her and then the embarrassment of her family at the balls in Meryton. She plays the role of heroine by becoming the victim of Mr. Wickham and Mr. Darcy. When Mr. Bingley and Mr. Darcy arrive in town they accept the invitation to the first ball. She is offended by Mr. Darcy's explanation to Mr. Bingley -who has stopped dancing with Jane Bennet- of why he won't dance with Elizabeth, ""Which do you mean?" ...read more.

Conclusion

fluently, gave him to understand, that her sentiments had undergone so material a change, since the period to which he alluded, as to make her receive with gratitude and pleasure, his present assurances." The use of clunky language that the narrator exploits to summarise Elizabeth's acceptance captures the moment of joyful incoherence for this supremely well spoken character. Elizabeth accepts Mr. Darcy's proposal immediately but it wasn't very fluent. When Elizabeth goes on to admit that she has love for Mr. Darcy her language skills break down. For Austen this shows how she would expect an ideal couple to act, as Elizabeth is grateful for Mr. Darcy's proposal and she is obliged to accept. In conclusion I think that Austen proves that the first sentence in the book has great relevance to the rest of the novel and it shows that all men are in want of a wife but it is not all women who want a man for their money. I think that Austen has shown her view on marriage and love well. The four marriages are split two and two. The first two marriages are not ideal and Austen shows this well through the character of Elizabeth. Austen's intentions for the novel are to show the life of women in the 1700's. She shows this well and we can tell how women lived in the 1700's. 1,758 words G.C.S.E Coursework "Pride and Prejudice" By Victoria Storey 11.6 02/08/2004 ...read more.

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