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Barry Hines in writing a Kestrel for a Knave wants his readers to think about the way that society lets some people be rejects..

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Introduction

Barry Hines in writing a Kestrel for a Knave wants his readers to think about the way that society lets some people be rejects. A kestrel for a knave is about a poor troubled Yorkshire lad by the name of Billy Casper. What he imagines to be out of reach and unbelievable are things we take for granted. He imagines love from his parents and just normal, every day things like fish and chips for supper and someone being nice to him. For Billy, that is a dream that will never become reality. Treated as a failure at school and unhappy at home, Billy discovers a new passion in life when he finds Kes, a kestrel hawk. Billy identifies with her silent strength and she inspires in him the trust and love that nothing else can. I don't think that Kes gives Billy the power to revolutionize and turn around his social life, because she doesn't. ...read more.

Middle

In the book after Billy meets with the milkman he takes a walk to a field overlooking a factory, which again is a reference to the working class background, that he lives in. Many people influence Billy's life from his family to his friends and to his teachers at school. His older brother bosses him about and they have no respect for each other. He expects Billy to be his personal slave and beats him up when he feels like it. For example when Billy doesn't buy a betting ticket he goes round to his school and embarrasses him in front of all his school friends. His mum is to caught up in her boyfriends and her own life to take a minute and look at how her own sons are doing. This shows how people can influence you to do things and how important it is to have a stable family and how much it can affect you emotionally and mentally. ...read more.

Conclusion

I think this works very well as he likes to describe the smallest things like when he sets the scene for the classroom. This is also a good example for his punctuation as he uses short sentences, "the scuffle of a turning page" etc. the problem with using so much description is that it leaves the readers having no imagination on the scene or character. Most of the book is written as Billy's thoughts on things and he doesn't use speech that much to describe things. This book reflects on many issues that still carry on today but have got even more serious. It shows how lucky we are to have a family who care and love us and how important it is not to take it for granted, as there are many children who don't know the feeling of being loved. I think Barry Hines used a very good story to bring the message across on how people can be made to feel. And that everyone deserves a second chance and should not be judged on wealth but on the persons morals and personality, ...read more.

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