• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Battle of Britain.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Battle Of Britain Summary The Battle of Britain was the aerial conflict between British and German air forces in the skies over the United Kingdom in the summer and autumn of 1940. It was one of the most important moments in Britain's twentieth century history and a decisive and crucial turning point of the Second World War. Royal Air Force Fighter Command defeated the Luftwaffe's attempt to gain air authority over southern England and saved Britain from German invasion and occupation. The defensive victory won in 1940 ruined German hopes of a quick end to the war in Western Europe and ensured that Britain remained a free and independent state able to carry on the war. Victory was eventually won in partnership with more powerful allies, America and the Soviet Union. In spring 1940, German forces had swept across most of Western Europe so rapidly that by the end of June resistance had ceased. ...read more.

Middle

Without supporting air cover, the Royal Navy would have been neutralised, unable to oppose invasion forces in the face of overpowering air attack. The German occupation of Denmark and Norway in April caused the weakening of the RAF fighter defences as squadrons had to be spread across northern Britain to oppose any possible threat from Scandinavia. In May and June, the Battle of France, especially the intensaive action during the evacuation of Allied armies at Dunkirk, had taken a heavy toll with 477 fighters lost and 284 pilots killed. All but three of Fighter Command's squadrons had been engaged. On 3 June, Air Chief Marshal Sir Hugh Dowding, AOC (army operational command) -in-C Fighter Command, told Britain that if the expected German offensive came at this moment, he could not guarantee air control for more than 48 hours. Nevertheless, he was hopeful that a reasonable break from intensive operations would help to restore his Command to full strength. ...read more.

Conclusion

For the British, it ran from 10 July - 31 October 1940. For the Germans it began on 13 August, Adlertag or "Eagle Day". The key to success for the Luftwaffe was the destruction of the RAF's fighter force. On the other hand, for Fighter Command it was to hold back bombing and inflict losses, preferably before the target was reached. The campaign itself was marked by several distinct phases. As the battle developed, the Luftwaffe attacked targets moving further and further inland from coastal shipping to forward fighter airfields and radar stations, 11 Group sector airfields and finally London. The crucial period of the battle was between 24 August and 15 September. Fighter Command came closest to losing when its vital sector airfields around London were attacked. The decisive turning point came on 7 September when the Luftwaffe switched its attention to the capital. This tactical mistake allowed Fighter Command to recover its strength rapidly to inflict, on 15 September, losses significant enough to show the Germans the battle could not be won. Carl Flaherty Battle of Britain (summer of 1914) ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE War Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE War Poetry essays

  1. Enders Game - Summary

    The teachers stacked the sides against him more and more each battle, and ender became more and more upset with the system. This came to a focal point when he was ordered to fight 2 units against his 1, the other units completely fortified.

  2. Why did William win at the Battle of Hastings?

    "Waving his sword, he shouted: "I am still living and, by Gods help, shall yet have victory!" He probably also reminded them there was no where to run to; only the sea lay behind them." (William the Conqueror- Philip Ardagh)

  1. The Battle Of Hastings was in the year 1066, in the medieval times.The battle ...

    When Harold Godwinson fought with Harold Hadraada, Harold Godwinson won but then was informed that he to go to war with William so some of his army were lost during the other battle in the north coast. Harold Godwinson's army were tired and exhausted when the came back from the

  2. This essay will consist of a number of Interpretations some agreeing with the popular ...

    He is also very popular with the British people because he only writes good things about the British, therefore this piece is very one sided. The popular myth was that the Battle of Britain was the turning point of the war and "the few" saved Britain and the rest of the world from Nazism.

  1. By 1943 Great Britain had overcome the threat passed by the German aircraft and ...

    However to turn the whole battle around, towards the end the allies had radar fitted into their ships and they could then tell exactly where the U-boats were. Also towards the end of the battle the RAF sent their planes to support the Ships.

  2. Why did Britain win the Battle of Britain?

    From the outset the British generals knew they had their backs against the wall in resisting the planes of the German Luftwaffe who not only outnumbered the planes of the RAF by four to one, but were furthermore controlled by the best-trained pilots in the world.

  1. The Crimean War.

    surprised by the warmth of the Crimean autumn, and this may be responsible for the over heating, of the fine Russian horses, so highly regarded by their army. The weather would have been very similar to home turf for the British soldiers, who were better matched to fight in such conditions.

  2. The popular myth of the Battle of Britain quickly emerged during the early part ...

    But his speeches don't mention Dowding; this is because I know that Churchill did not agree on issues with Dowding. Churchill is biased and nationalistic in his speeches because at the end of the day he himself knows that they are a good form of propaganda.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work