• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Battle of Britain.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Battle Of Britain Summary The Battle of Britain was the aerial conflict between British and German air forces in the skies over the United Kingdom in the summer and autumn of 1940. It was one of the most important moments in Britain's twentieth century history and a decisive and crucial turning point of the Second World War. Royal Air Force Fighter Command defeated the Luftwaffe's attempt to gain air authority over southern England and saved Britain from German invasion and occupation. The defensive victory won in 1940 ruined German hopes of a quick end to the war in Western Europe and ensured that Britain remained a free and independent state able to carry on the war. Victory was eventually won in partnership with more powerful allies, America and the Soviet Union. In spring 1940, German forces had swept across most of Western Europe so rapidly that by the end of June resistance had ceased. ...read more.

Middle

Without supporting air cover, the Royal Navy would have been neutralised, unable to oppose invasion forces in the face of overpowering air attack. The German occupation of Denmark and Norway in April caused the weakening of the RAF fighter defences as squadrons had to be spread across northern Britain to oppose any possible threat from Scandinavia. In May and June, the Battle of France, especially the intensaive action during the evacuation of Allied armies at Dunkirk, had taken a heavy toll with 477 fighters lost and 284 pilots killed. All but three of Fighter Command's squadrons had been engaged. On 3 June, Air Chief Marshal Sir Hugh Dowding, AOC (army operational command) -in-C Fighter Command, told Britain that if the expected German offensive came at this moment, he could not guarantee air control for more than 48 hours. Nevertheless, he was hopeful that a reasonable break from intensive operations would help to restore his Command to full strength. ...read more.

Conclusion

For the British, it ran from 10 July - 31 October 1940. For the Germans it began on 13 August, Adlertag or "Eagle Day". The key to success for the Luftwaffe was the destruction of the RAF's fighter force. On the other hand, for Fighter Command it was to hold back bombing and inflict losses, preferably before the target was reached. The campaign itself was marked by several distinct phases. As the battle developed, the Luftwaffe attacked targets moving further and further inland from coastal shipping to forward fighter airfields and radar stations, 11 Group sector airfields and finally London. The crucial period of the battle was between 24 August and 15 September. Fighter Command came closest to losing when its vital sector airfields around London were attacked. The decisive turning point came on 7 September when the Luftwaffe switched its attention to the capital. This tactical mistake allowed Fighter Command to recover its strength rapidly to inflict, on 15 September, losses significant enough to show the Germans the battle could not be won. Carl Flaherty Battle of Britain (summer of 1914) ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE War Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE War Poetry essays

  1. Why did William win at the Battle of Hastings?

    "Waving his sword, he shouted: "I am still living and, by Gods help, shall yet have victory!" He probably also reminded them there was no where to run to; only the sea lay behind them." (William the Conqueror- Philip Ardagh)

  2. Enders Game - Summary

    And he succeeds. At battle school, he is at first ignored by his unit and commander, ordered to not participate in training exercises or take part in the combat arena. He trains by himself or with a girl, Petra, who has taken pity on him.

  1. This essay will consist of a number of Interpretations some agreeing with the popular ...

    Posters were quickly put up all over Britain with slogans quoted from Winston Churchill, "Never was so much owed by so many to so few" Slogans like this imbedded into people's minds that the heroic R.A.F. pilots whom the Germans outnumbered, beat them against all odds.

  2. The Battle Of Hastings was in the year 1066, in the medieval times.The battle ...

    He was very encouraging when he marched his army all the way up to the north coast, defeat Harold Hadraada and then march them all the way back down to the south coast and battle with William and his army.

  1. Why did Britain win the Battle of Britain?

    This tactic could mean that Britain would not receive as many losses and this could be an important factor in determining if the Royal Air Force would last. After all they didn't have as many units as the Germans and they had to make every plane count.

  2. Britain and the Western Front.

    ..."First German Officer: The English soldiers fight like lions. Second German Officer: Yes but they are led by donkeys"... This primary source of information explains the slow pace of the planned attack, which would have overwhelmed the German forces if the heavy trench packs had not held back the forces.

  1. This essay would be examining the methods through which the British won the Battle ...

    to provide increased observation and rear protection. After the battle RAF pilots adopted a variant on the German formations with some success. The fact that 'sweeps' by German fighters not escorting bombers were often ignored by fighter command seems to reinforce the idea that Dowding sought always to preserve his fighter force to fight another day.

  2. Why did Britain win the battle of Britain?

    The commander of Luftflotte 3, Hugo Sperrle, wanted to eradicate the air defence infrastructure by bombing. His counterpart in Luftflotte 2, Albert Kesselring, demanded to attack London directly-either to bombard the British government into submission or draw RAF fighters up into a decisive battle.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work