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Before deciding whether Fate was responsible for certain events and conflicts in the love of Romeo and Juliet, it is significa

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Introduction

ROMEO AND JULIET ARE 'STARCROSSED' WE ARE TOLD, AND THERE ARE OTHER SUGGESTIONS THAT EVENTS ARE NOT COMPLETELY UNDER THEIR CONTROL. LOOK IN DETAIL AT THE IMPORTANT CONFLICTS WHICH AFFECT EACH LOVER AND DISCUSS TO WHAT EXTENT THEY ARE ABLE TO CHOOSE WHAT THEY DO OR WHETHER THEY ARE SIMPLY SWEPT ALONG BY CIRCUMSTANCES CONTROLLED BY FATE. (MAKE CLOSE REFERENCE TO THE TEXT). Before deciding whether Fate was responsible for certain events and conflicts in the love of Romeo and Juliet, it is significant that we first answer the obvious question: What is fate? Well, according to some Dictionaries, fate is the 'inevitable destiny or necessity destined term of life; doom.' In simpler more understandable English, fate can be described as a preplanned chain of events controlling one's life, or as many believed in Shakespeare's time, fate is where your path in life is written in the stars. From one viewpoint, it is true to believe that most of what happens in the play, especially the most relevant conflicts that lead it to be a tragedy were caused by either the mistakes the couple made themselves or the mistakes made by the characters who influenced them. (Five characters in the play deeply affect the tragic road of the couple, the Friar, Benvolio, Mercutio, Tybalt and the Nurse). From another viewpoint, it is also true that Shakespeare reminds us that many events may be partially affected by the unfortunate fate of the two lovers. ...read more.

Middle

He overhears Juliet's confession of love. When Juliet finds out that Romeo is listening her first thoughts are for his safety as there are 'kinsmen' around, Romeo knows what lies ahead but he assures Juliet there is 'more peril' in her eye than 'twenty of there swords'. Here Romeo seems strong compared to in the beginning of the play; we see he is willing to risk his life to be able to spend some time in the company of Juliet. We see again Juliet's strong character in this scene as she addresses Romeo directly and plainly, asking down-to-earth questions. It is important to notice that it is Juliet who first mentions marriage 'perform the rite', and sets Romeo on to arrange it, showing that her commitment is absolute and unconditional. As the couple choose to get married we can argue that this scene is not fate and therefore any circumstances as an effect of the marriage will also be the doings of Romeo and Juliet themselves. But we may also argue that it was fate that bought Romeo to Juliet's balcony at the precise time when Juliet is unknowingly confessing her love to him. The consequence of the couple's marriage is the death of Mercutio, who is fatally wounded by Tybalt. Before Mercutio dies he puts a curse on the two families in the play, 'A plaque o' both your houses'. Romeo who was the peacemaker in the scene finds the death of Mercutio too much for him: 'Fire-eyed fury be my conduct now,' he cries. ...read more.

Conclusion

Here we see he is feeling relieved that he wont be burdened with fate anymore. Just as Romeo has drunk the poison the Friar arrives, and tells the waking Juliet to fly from the place. He goes on to talk of 'a greater power' which has 'thwarted' their 'intents', this is again referring to fate. The Friar leaves Juliet and runs, Juliet realising that Romeo is dead stabs herself. We ask ourselves if these deaths are fate or whether they are all avoidable. It is true that they may be as a result of the rush of emotions as the scene is extremely dramatic and the characters seem to loose their balance but, we may also argue that it is fate which makes Romeo kill himself just before the Friar arrives, and it is also fate that Juliet awakes a few seconds after Romeo kills himself. It seems they have bad luck in the end of the play. But they do not die in vain as both families realise their errors and the play ends as Capulet and Montague reconciled in their grief. After looking at each event in the play I have come to the conclusion that Romeo and Juliet are partly, fated to doom. It is true that some events could have been avoided but even within these events you get a feeling of things taking their own shape, as if it's meant to be. Shakespeare may have meant his audience to interpret the happenings of the play as influenced by some higher power. ...read more.

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