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Blake & Wordsworth were both Romantic Poets, yet their visions of London are opposed to each other. What are their conflicting visions of the same city and how do they differ from one another?

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Introduction

Blake & Wordsworth were both Romantic Poets, yet their visions of London are opposed to each other. What are their conflicting visions of the same city and how do they differ from one another? By Jack Benjamin William Blake and William Wordsworth were both known as Romantic poets, preoccupied with the idea of the pastoral idyll: a bucolic landscape where man lived in harmony with nature, and whose pastoral fantasies typically invoked pagan deities and mythology. Blake's poem "London" is directly contrasting to Wordsworth's "Composed upon Westminster Bridge." The views of Blake in his poem present dirge-like dour imagery creating a funeral tone, whereas Wordsworth's is full of exultant eulogistic imagery creating and optimistic tone and view of London. The poem "London" by Blake and "Composed upon Westminster Bridge" by Wordsworth have very different views about our capital city. One main difference is that Wordsworth describes the physical aspects of London and Blake describes the emotional environment. Blake's poem "London" focuses on the negative aspects of the city giving his poem a pessimistic tone. William Blake brought out the gloomy characteristics of London due to him being a Romantic. As a Romantic, his poem "London" followed the way in which a romantic writes. He wanted to portray the natural aspect of London which is pessimistic and funereal. ...read more.

Middle

These can be spotted by the change in language from the basic idea expressed to the development of the original idea expressed. This is portrayed by the change in rhyme scheme from "A B B A A B B A," which is a complex rhyme scheme, to "C D C D C D," which are rhyming couplets. This split of the poem is present here due to Wordsworth (in octet) wanted to show his view of the city, in detail, whereas in the sestet, the narrator interprets the beauty in terms of the beauty of the natural world. In contrast, "London", is separated into four stanzas containing four lines. Each stanza is only one sentence and only contains one full stop. Each stanza has a regular rhyme scheme which consists of rhyming couplets. This rhyming scheme and layout is ordinary and dull and restrictive which is similar to Blake's view of London. The fours stanza can suggest that each one is like the next leg of a walk through London and it is as if you are walking through each "charter'd" street. Contained within each stanza, a different characteristic of London is expressed. Each stanza focuses on a negative aspect of London, for example: "How the Chimney Sweeper's cry Every Black'ning Church appalls; And the hapless Soldier's sigh Runs down Palace walls." ...read more.

Conclusion

His views of looking on the optimistic side of things prove that London should be seen and judged for oneself. This title Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802 uses a specific time, date and where is was written which is a message to the reader that the poet, even though conflicting a Romantic's views, remains a Romantic but could not submit to this predominantly influential vision of beauty. Contrasting this message, William Blake uses pessimistic diction to create a funereal tone to formulate negative and depressing images of London. He has used this to portray to the reader that London is filled with hatred and dishonesty along with the corrupt poverty and that nothing in this city will ever become pure and innocent again. . Wordsworth sees the city in natural terms and attempts to reconcile his love of nature with the beauty of this specific sight from the top of that bridge. In conclusion, the two conflicting visions of William Blake's poem London and William Wordsworth's poem Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802 are easily distinguishable from each other due to the pessimistic and dour message of a corrupt London and the optimistic and eulogistic message of an innocent and honest London. Their conflicting visions of the same city was due to what they believed the right message to be expressed by Romantic poets was Jack Benjamin LVP Mr. Hartley ...read more.

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