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Blood Brothers: the issues of a class system and the theory of nature versus nurture

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Introduction

Blood Brothers Willy Russell's play, 'Blood Brothers' is set in Liverpool in the early eighties and follows the life of two main characters, Eddie Lyons, and Mickey Johnston. Throughout the course of the play we are shown the issues of a class system and the theory of nature versus nurture. Russell encourages the audience to question everything they see, as the characters seem realistic, but we are reminded constantly that what we are watching is a construction. He achieves this by using many dramatic devices, which prove to be very effective throughout the course of the play. This includes the use of the traditional narrator, to also using other characters as tools in the play to help reveal further information to us, which we may not have otherwise seen. In 'Blood Brothers' the characters fall into two very stereotypical groups, the working class Johnston's, and their friends and family, and the middle class Lyons. ...read more.

Middle

This is revealed to us after we here the Mother is due too have twins, and that there is no way she can cope with them both. These events immediately make the audience feel compassion for the Mother, her husband has just left her, and 'the welfare' are threatening to take away her children even though, 'they mean the world' to her. We don't meet the character Linda until Act 2, scene 4, even though she develops through the play to be a very important role, especially within her relationships with the twins, Mickey, and Eddie. She is almost used a dramatic device herself within the play, and even takes the role of the narrator in Act 5, scene 1. From the moment we first meet Linda we know she is a great friend of Mickey's but she soon develops a strong friendship Eddie as well, and as a group they have fun and joke, causing 'the three of them to break up with giggles'. ...read more.

Conclusion

Throughout the course of the play superstition plays a very big part in the forthcoming events. We first encounter this in Act 1, scene 3 Mrs Lyons places new shoes on the table, and the Mother becomes very nervous and shouts out, 'Oh God. Never put new shoes on a table'. We are then reminded of this encounter at the end of the scene when the narrator quotes yet more superstitious acts. This is one of the reasons that Mrs Lyons uses the Bible, when she makes the Mother swear that she 'will never speak of this to anyone, as if the twins find out they will die'. As Mrs Johnston is a very superstitious person, swearing on the Bible would mean a lot to her, and she therefore believes the tales that Mrs Lyons Spins. Such events like this pop up throughout the play, and they also play heavily in the final act, where we are shown yet more symbols of bad luck by the narrator, such as the quote, 'Only black cards dealt on the thirteenth day'. ...read more.

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