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Both Iago and Heathcliff show their hatred in their unprincipled exploitation of those around them. Detail this, and compare the ways in which they do it.

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Introduction

Both Iago and Heathcliff show their hatred in their unprincipled exploitation of those around them. Detail this, and compare the ways in which they do it. Everyone would agree that Iago and Heathcliff have a vast amount of bitter hatred. It is my belief that they show this in a variety of unprincipled acts against them, predominantly those who, through simple acts, made them wild with jealousy or vengeful desires, or sometimes they just took advantage of a person's weakness. We see Iago cunningly manipulate Othello, Roderigo, Cassio and Emilia, while Heathcliff cruelly, but openly, tries to destroy Hindley, Hareton, Isabella and Linton. Iago, first and foremost, completely destroys Othello, changing him from a loving, trusting, controlled man - "I love the gentle Desdemona" to a deranged obsessive - "my bloody thoughts with violent pace", who kills his beloved wife. He exploits Othello's inner anguishes regarding Desdemona's love, by claiming Desdemona is cheating on him with Cassio. Iago begins with the seemingly innocuous, "Honest, my lord?" ...read more.

Middle

He has no reason (apart from a vague conjecture of infidelity, which even he says, is only "mere suspicion") to treat her like this, and she is just another victim to his unprincipled exploitation. Heathcliff, like Iago is bitter, and shamelessly, even openly exploits those around him, out of jealousy and an obsession for revenge. He destroyed Hindley, using his vices of drinking and gambling, and the circumstances in which Hindley died are quite suspicious, although Heathcliff claims "that fool's body should be buried at cross-roads", implying it was suicide. Yet, we remember that Hindley treated Heathcliff very badly after the death of old Mr Earnshaw, in a way that, as Nelly, says, could make "a fiend out of a saint", although Heathcliff is excessive in his retribution. He also takes out his anger on Hindley's son Hareton. Hareton received terrible treatment and the hands of both Hindley and Heathcliff. There are numerous incidents when the terrible life Hareton leads is clearly depicted, when he is dropped of the stairs by a drunken Hindley, who says, "As sure as I'm living, I'll break the brat's neck." ...read more.

Conclusion

Linton does not treat Cathy well, either. After the marriage he becomes heavily influenced by Heathcliff, as tells Nelly - "He (Heathcliff) says I'm not to be soft with Catherine - she's my wife...he says, she hates me and wants me to die, that she may have my money, but she shan't have it and she shan't go home." Iago and Heathcliff truly exploit those around them in very unprincipled ways. Iago carries out his corrupt deeds because he feels he has been cheated, and because he is a fiend, who cannot bear seeing others happy. He is very cunning and manipulative, and no one realises what he is doing until it is too late. Heathcliff exploits those around him because of his obsession for power and revenge and hate towards everyone who separated him from Catherine. Yet Heathcliff is, on comparison with Iago, open about his evil actions towards others. He has also truly suffered, whereas Iago is satanic in his motivation to destroy others. Yet both show their hatred in unprincipled exploitation of those around them, and the audience is relieved at their excruciating end. By Anita Power 4157.doc Page 1 of 4 28-04-07 ...read more.

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