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Brave New World - summary.

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Introduction

Brave New World Essay It seems clear that most people in the World State are happy and contented. There are no longer problems such as disease, war, poverty, or unemployment in this society. Why then, do Bernard Helmholtz and John criticise the quality of their lives? What is wrong with World State Society? 600 hundred years into the future has advanced the new World State technologically, and perhaps also in the way of life for its citizens. Some might even go so far as to say it is an improvement. At least, in the physical aspects of their lifestyle. Happiness and contentment seemingly prevail. What price though, has had to be paid for that happiness and contentment? Nothing comes for free after all. The question is - was that price too high? Bernard Marx - an Alpha plus male, is ostracised because of his inferior looks and his thoughts and ideas about the promiscuous sexual practices considered not only healthy but also mandatory. ...read more.

Middle

Meanwhile, John's dissatisfaction with the World State, and with the civilised world is in part to do with the fact that he had not been conditioned to accept it. Hypnopaedia, or sleep teaching, is an essential part of World State life. If it were not for hypnopaedia, the world would not have been as stable as it was. The countless lessons drummed into the citizen's brains are the very reason for people believing what they do. In Brave New World, the belief that "repeating something several times does not make it true" is challenged. One is forced to consider the question - what is true? In the World State society at least the answer is clear. What Society deems as truth will be held as truth. John never had the repetitions, or the conditioning. His education had come from a society whose morals were completely different to those practiced in the World State, and because of that, not only did he feel out of place, but he regarded the Brave New World as more or less a living hell. ...read more.

Conclusion

" 'But I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness, I want sin.' " In fact,' said Mustapha Mond, 'Your claiming the right to be unhappy.' 'All right, then,' said the Savage defiantly, 'I'm claiming the right to be unhappy.' " P.219. The only reason that there seems to be something wrong with the World State was the fact that it did not adhere to our own society's morals. Yet it is each society's beliefs that define right, and Brave New World is in every sense just like society of today. One is judged based on the discretion of one's society. How then, can one deem the World State as wrong, when it is merely following the standards that its society has set? In this world, perhaps there is no such thing as right or wrong, only human whim. Regina Duong 9SK ...read more.

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