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Browning gives us insights into people at crucial points in their lives. Compare the ways in which the poems use the dramatic monologue form as well as language to bring out the feelings and situation of the characters in the poems.

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Introduction

Browning gives us insights into people at crucial points in their lives. Compare the ways in which the poems use the dramatic monologue form as well as language to bring out the feelings and situation of the characters in the poems. Robert Browning in all three of his poems, 'My Last Duchess', 'The Laboratory' and 'Porphyry's lover', create an unusual original perspective for the readers of the poems. They all are of the same theme, murders/killings, because of love. Either because the lover is jealous, or because of hate or of love itself. 'The Laboratory' , shows us insight of a women who's 'lover', is in love with another women. She wants to kill for love, and is motivated by jealousy. To hurt the man, she intends to poison the persona, with the poison the man makes. The women, who Browning has made to narrate and express her feelings in the poem, seems to be quite strange, but also very sly and cunning when it comes to getting the poison of the man. From the way the language is expressed, to define her character. She even helps him make the poison, 'Grind away moisten and mash up thy paste...' ...read more.

Middle

This makes this poem different from the others. But also complicated, as its difficult to know when the man narrating and is talking to the envoy, or himself. And we only really find out who the Duke is talking to at the end. They talk about him and his past life or experience with his wife. With the help of a painting of his wife. And this is portrayed with his expressions of anger and jealousy from his past wife. This poem is also about a killing. But not as obvious as the others, for it is not expressed in detail as much as the other poems. It is also about love and the man being jealous, or annoyed with his wife communicating with other men, and not paying all her attention to him. 'Too soon made glad, Too easily impressed...' From the way in which Browning has used the language we get an overall idea about the character. The way in which Browning has expressed the words in the poem for the character. Browning has made it formal, which suits the Duke's powerful character. The poem shows us that the duke's wife did not satisfy him. ...read more.

Conclusion

Browning has used more original writing in this poem when it comes to the killing. You would think that the killing would be powerful and fast. But Browning has created an unusual setting. The killing is calm and simple. There is no passion or violence. We could even say that the absence of passion and violence is worrying. And it really creates a different atmosphere compared to the other poems. 'And strangled her. No pain felt she; I am quite sure she felt no pain.' Browning uses repetition here to create more to the scene, at that moment, to make it more dramatic. 'That moment she was mine, mine fair...' The ending also very calm, as to, 'And thus we sit together now, And all night long we have not stirred...' All three of these poems are quite different, and Browning has used a range of ideas and language to create three very good poems. The language in the poems help to define each character with out actual describing them. The dramatic monologue helps the poem to see every character's view. And to help give us an overall idea of why the characters in the poems act in such ways to others. ?? ?? ?? ?? Rebecca Laughton, Mrs Sanderson, English, UC4U, 02/05/07 ...read more.

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